The Impact of Increased Skin-to-Skin Contact with Mother in Breast Feeding Neonates on Exclusive Breast Feeding at Four Weeks and Eight Weeks Post Partum

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202116
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Increased Skin-to-Skin Contact with Mother in Breast Feeding Neonates on Exclusive Breast Feeding at Four Weeks and Eight Weeks Post Partum
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background:  Breastfeeding has been recognized globally as critical to the health of newborns.  Many routine hospital practices have a negative effect on exclusive breastfeeding. Purpose: To evaluate duration of skin-to-skin contact (STS) as a nursing intervention to increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding after discharge. Study Question: Does a higher number of minutes of STS in the hospital increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding at four weeks and eight weeks postpartum?  Hypothesis: Increased STS times will be positively correlated with an increased rate of exclusive breastfeeding at four weeks and eight weeks postpartum.  Study Sample: Term pregnant women who have a vaginal delivery of a well newborn, with intention to exclusively breastfeed.  Methodology:  This is a descriptive correlational study, with the intervention of STS.  Newborns will be placed STS with their mothers at birth for those participating in the study.  Mothers will be encouraged to maintain frequent STS with their newborns while in the hospital, and will maintain a log of STS time while in the hospital.  GSH Lactation Consultants will make follow-up phone calls at four weeks and eight weeks postpartum for telephone assessment of exclusive breastfeeding, using the Index of Breastfeeding Status.  Projected N=75 subjects.    Results: The results will be analyzed using Pearson R Correlation.  The results will be used to determine if STS is an effective nursing intervention to support and increase duration of exclusive breastfeeding.  Implications for Practice:  STS for all mothers and babies would involve a practice change: instead of taking newborn infants to a warmer at birth, placing infants directly on mother’s abdomen to initiate STS at birth. This intervention has already been demonstrated to improve neurobehavioral outcomes, thermoregulation, and glucose regulation.
Keywords:
Skin to skin; Exclusive Breastfeeding
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Increased Skin-to-Skin Contact with Mother in Breast Feeding Neonates on Exclusive Breast Feeding at Four Weeks and Eight Weeks Post Partumen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202116-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background:  Breastfeeding has been recognized globally as critical to the health of newborns.  Many routine hospital practices have a negative effect on exclusive breastfeeding. Purpose: To evaluate duration of skin-to-skin contact (STS) as a nursing intervention to increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding after discharge. Study Question: Does a higher number of minutes of STS in the hospital increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding at four weeks and eight weeks postpartum?  Hypothesis: Increased STS times will be positively correlated with an increased rate of exclusive breastfeeding at four weeks and eight weeks postpartum.  Study Sample: Term pregnant women who have a vaginal delivery of a well newborn, with intention to exclusively breastfeed.  Methodology:  This is a descriptive correlational study, with the intervention of STS.  Newborns will be placed STS with their mothers at birth for those participating in the study.  Mothers will be encouraged to maintain frequent STS with their newborns while in the hospital, and will maintain a log of STS time while in the hospital.  GSH Lactation Consultants will make follow-up phone calls at four weeks and eight weeks postpartum for telephone assessment of exclusive breastfeeding, using the Index of Breastfeeding Status.  Projected N=75 subjects.    Results: The results will be analyzed using Pearson R Correlation.  The results will be used to determine if STS is an effective nursing intervention to support and increase duration of exclusive breastfeeding.  Implications for Practice:  STS for all mothers and babies would involve a practice change: instead of taking newborn infants to a warmer at birth, placing infants directly on mother’s abdomen to initiate STS at birth. This intervention has already been demonstrated to improve neurobehavioral outcomes, thermoregulation, and glucose regulation.en_GB
dc.subjectSkin to skinen_GB
dc.subjectExclusive Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:10:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:10:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.