Executive Function and Dual Task Performance of Gait in Mexican Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202122
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Executive Function and Dual Task Performance of Gait in Mexican Elders
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: To describe the relationship between executive function and gait velocity under three walking conditions: usual gait, simple dual task and complex dual task of Mexican elders. Methods: Descriptive cross sectional design. Random sampling by cluster. Sample size was 202 elders drawn from eight senior centers; with power of 90%, effect size for a bilateral correlational test of 0.22, and significance level of 0.05. Executive function was measured by the Color Trails Test (attention and mental flexibility) and the STROOP test (attention inhibitory control). Gait was measured at usual speed (simple task), simple dual task (walking while holding a tray with a glass of water and a complex dual task walking while repeating as many words as possible starting with a randomized letter. Results: Mean age was 70.28 years (SD = 6.84), years of school were 5.44 (SD = 3.44). Gait velocity under usual speed was 1.006 m/s (SD = .242), simple dual task was 0.958 m/s (SD = .248), and under complex dual task 0.651 m/s (SD = .247). Attention (Color Trails part A) was inverse related to all three walking conditions (r =-0.328, -0.343, -0.188, all ps < .01, usual, simple dual and complex dual task, respectively). Mental flexibility (Color Trails interference rate) was inverse related only to walking under dual complex task (r = -0.169, p < .05). Attention inhibitory control was inverse related to complex dual task performance of gait (r = -0.165, p < .01). Conclusions: Elders reduce their usual speed under both, simple dual task and complex dual task suggesting that in order to attend an extra task while walking they compensate by decreasing gait speed. Reducing their gait speed does not guarantee success on the cognitive task, rather only they are focusing on the other task.
Keywords:
Gait; elders; executive function
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExecutive Function and Dual Task Performance of Gait in Mexican Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202122-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: To describe the relationship between executive function and gait velocity under three walking conditions: usual gait, simple dual task and complex dual task of Mexican elders. Methods: Descriptive cross sectional design. Random sampling by cluster. Sample size was 202 elders drawn from eight senior centers; with power of 90%, effect size for a bilateral correlational test of 0.22, and significance level of 0.05. Executive function was measured by the Color Trails Test (attention and mental flexibility) and the STROOP test (attention inhibitory control). Gait was measured at usual speed (simple task), simple dual task (walking while holding a tray with a glass of water and a complex dual task walking while repeating as many words as possible starting with a randomized letter. Results: Mean age was 70.28 years (SD = 6.84), years of school were 5.44 (SD = 3.44). Gait velocity under usual speed was 1.006 m/s (SD = .242), simple dual task was 0.958 m/s (SD = .248), and under complex dual task 0.651 m/s (SD = .247). Attention (Color Trails part A) was inverse related to all three walking conditions (r =-0.328, -0.343, -0.188, all ps < .01, usual, simple dual and complex dual task, respectively). Mental flexibility (Color Trails interference rate) was inverse related only to walking under dual complex task (r = -0.169, p < .05). Attention inhibitory control was inverse related to complex dual task performance of gait (r = -0.165, p < .01). Conclusions: Elders reduce their usual speed under both, simple dual task and complex dual task suggesting that in order to attend an extra task while walking they compensate by decreasing gait speed. Reducing their gait speed does not guarantee success on the cognitive task, rather only they are focusing on the other task.en_GB
dc.subjectGaiten_GB
dc.subjecteldersen_GB
dc.subjectexecutive functionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:11:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:11:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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