Teaching Physiologic Birth in Maternal/Newborn Nursing Courses in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs: Current Challenges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202125
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Physiologic Birth in Maternal/Newborn Nursing Courses in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs: Current Challenges
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Title: Teaching Physiologic Birth in Maternal/Newborn Nursing Courses in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs:  Current Challenges Authors:  Ana C. Sanchez Birkhead, RN, WHNP-BC, PhD, Lynn Clark Callister, RN, PhD, FAAN, Nicole Fletcher, RN, Allie Holt, RN   Purpose: For low-risk childbearing women, fewer technological interventions are associated with better physical and psychosocial outcomes, yet un-medicated physiologic births are not as common as they were previously. As a result, fewer undergraduate nursing students experience caring for women who choose physiologic birth—presenting a challenge for nurse educators with implications for preparation of students to provide appropriate care for childbearing women when they graduate. Methods: This exploratory, descriptive qualitative study was conducted among 150 randomly-selected undergraduate nursing programs in the United States to explore the challenges of educating nursing students about low intervention birth. Findings: Four themes described current challenges: lack of placement opportunities, education versus clinical practice, evidence-based support of physiologic birth and the need for more research on pedagogy that effectively educates future nurses for low-intervention births within highly technical units. Conclusion: Most of the maternal/newborn nursing faculty who responded to our survey stated they provided students with varying amounts of information on caring for women requesting physiologic births.  Most were aware of the latest evidence-based research on providing supportive care for childbearing women however, not all professors taught these care practices in their curriculum. Working collaboratively across institutions, educators can develop common pedagogies to ensure that future nurses will be prepared to care for women requesting all types of birth options.  Graduates will then emerge equipped with the latest evidence-based information, skills, and competencies to care for women and newborns by supporting the normalcy of birth.
Keywords:
maternal newborn nursing; childbirth education; evidence-based practice and nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Physiologic Birth in Maternal/Newborn Nursing Courses in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs: Current Challengesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202125-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Title: Teaching Physiologic Birth in Maternal/Newborn Nursing Courses in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs:  Current Challenges Authors:  Ana C. Sanchez Birkhead, RN, WHNP-BC, PhD, Lynn Clark Callister, RN, PhD, FAAN, Nicole Fletcher, RN, Allie Holt, RN   Purpose: For low-risk childbearing women, fewer technological interventions are associated with better physical and psychosocial outcomes, yet un-medicated physiologic births are not as common as they were previously. As a result, fewer undergraduate nursing students experience caring for women who choose physiologic birth—presenting a challenge for nurse educators with implications for preparation of students to provide appropriate care for childbearing women when they graduate. Methods: This exploratory, descriptive qualitative study was conducted among 150 randomly-selected undergraduate nursing programs in the United States to explore the challenges of educating nursing students about low intervention birth. Findings: Four themes described current challenges: lack of placement opportunities, education versus clinical practice, evidence-based support of physiologic birth and the need for more research on pedagogy that effectively educates future nurses for low-intervention births within highly technical units. Conclusion: Most of the maternal/newborn nursing faculty who responded to our survey stated they provided students with varying amounts of information on caring for women requesting physiologic births.  Most were aware of the latest evidence-based research on providing supportive care for childbearing women however, not all professors taught these care practices in their curriculum. Working collaboratively across institutions, educators can develop common pedagogies to ensure that future nurses will be prepared to care for women requesting all types of birth options.  Graduates will then emerge equipped with the latest evidence-based information, skills, and competencies to care for women and newborns by supporting the normalcy of birth.en_GB
dc.subjectmaternal newborn nursingen_GB
dc.subjectchildbirth educationen_GB
dc.subjectevidence-based practice and nursing educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:11:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:11:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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