Integrating Advanced Writing Content into an Undergraduate Nursing Research Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202128
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating Advanced Writing Content into an Undergraduate Nursing Research Course
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: To discuss advanced oral/written communication integration into a 3 credit undergraduate nursing research course.  Methods: To become prepared to integrate writing/oral communication into the nursing research course, faculty completed a Writing in the Discipline workshop.  Then, faculty rearranged research content so two of three hours of class/week were used to discuss principles of nursing research, and one hour of class/week was devoted  to written/oral communication content/experiences. During the two hour sessions (up to 64 students) content typical of an undergraduate nursing research course was presented (Research Problems/Questions/Hypotheses, Theoretical Frameworks, Design, Sampling, Data Collection, Reliability/Validity, Data Analysis, Evidence Based Practice). Written/oral communication content was taught during the one hour sessions to smaller groups of students (up to 25), and  included APA format; grammar principles: pronoun antecedent, pronoun reference, run-on sentences, coordinating conjunction, prepositions, and commas; plagiarism; paraphrasing; punctuation; clarity of expression: wordiness,  active /passive voice; topic/key/concluding sentences; and transitional words. Students took a writing assessment prior to and after this content was presented. Written assignments included critiquing a research study and a ten page review of the literature on a clinical topic of interest. The oral assignment was a ten-minute presentation of their literature review. Results: Initially, students wondered why written/oral communication content was part of an undergraduate research course. However, as the semester progressed students came to realize it was appropriate to integrate written/oral communication content with research content/assignments. In addition, student mean scores improved in almost half of the areas of the writing assessment and faculty in courses which follow this course noticed improvement in students’ writing/speaking abilities, compared to students who did not have a course that incorporated written/oral communication with research.   Conclusion:  Integrating this content into a nursing research course is an appropriate and effective way to improve undergraduate students’ writing/oral communication.
Keywords:
nursing research; teaching/educating; undergraduate students
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegrating Advanced Writing Content into an Undergraduate Nursing Research Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202128-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: To discuss advanced oral/written communication integration into a 3 credit undergraduate nursing research course.  Methods: To become prepared to integrate writing/oral communication into the nursing research course, faculty completed a Writing in the Discipline workshop.  Then, faculty rearranged research content so two of three hours of class/week were used to discuss principles of nursing research, and one hour of class/week was devoted  to written/oral communication content/experiences. During the two hour sessions (up to 64 students) content typical of an undergraduate nursing research course was presented (Research Problems/Questions/Hypotheses, Theoretical Frameworks, Design, Sampling, Data Collection, Reliability/Validity, Data Analysis, Evidence Based Practice). Written/oral communication content was taught during the one hour sessions to smaller groups of students (up to 25), and  included APA format; grammar principles: pronoun antecedent, pronoun reference, run-on sentences, coordinating conjunction, prepositions, and commas; plagiarism; paraphrasing; punctuation; clarity of expression: wordiness,  active /passive voice; topic/key/concluding sentences; and transitional words. Students took a writing assessment prior to and after this content was presented. Written assignments included critiquing a research study and a ten page review of the literature on a clinical topic of interest. The oral assignment was a ten-minute presentation of their literature review. Results: Initially, students wondered why written/oral communication content was part of an undergraduate research course. However, as the semester progressed students came to realize it was appropriate to integrate written/oral communication content with research content/assignments. In addition, student mean scores improved in almost half of the areas of the writing assessment and faculty in courses which follow this course noticed improvement in students’ writing/speaking abilities, compared to students who did not have a course that incorporated written/oral communication with research.   Conclusion:  Integrating this content into a nursing research course is an appropriate and effective way to improve undergraduate students’ writing/oral communication.en_GB
dc.subjectnursing researchen_GB
dc.subjectteaching/educatingen_GB
dc.subjectundergraduate studentsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:11:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:11:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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