Validity and Reliability of the Morse Fall Scale on Three Progressive Care Units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202139
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validity and Reliability of the Morse Fall Scale on Three Progressive Care Units
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The problem is no validity or reliability testing of the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) in the progressive care unit (PCU) population was found in the literature. Knowledge in this area will advance nurses’ ability to identify those at risk for falls and therefore implement measures to prevent falls and injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the MFS and describe and correlate the factors of the MFS with falls in a sample of PCU patients at a large county hospital.   Methods Following Institutional Review Board approval, data were collected prospectively for three months for this descriptive correlational study. Charts were reviewed for MFS scores at admission for patients meeting the inclusion criteria. Results A total of 913 subjects were included in the sample. Age ranged from 18 to 95 years; the majority of subjects were male and Caucasian. Twenty-four patients fell once leaving 889 nonfallers. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for each total score on the MFS. Chi-square revealed a marginally significant relationship between falling and secondary diagnosis and falling and mental status. Discussion Data were not sufficient to change the risk level score ranges (low, moderate, and high risk for falling); therefore, focus shifted to the relationship between falling and mental status. A review of the hospital’s interventions for each fall risk level led the researchers to notice no interventions were listed to assess the patient’s mental status or what to do next once the status was known. This information was given to the appropriate hospital committee for review. Conclusions On-going reviews and analysis of current prevention programs in individual units in each hospital globally are a necessary part of the process to improve patient outcomes and save dollars.
Keywords:
progressive care unit; Morse Fall Scale; falls
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidity and Reliability of the Morse Fall Scale on Three Progressive Care Unitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202139-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The problem is no validity or reliability testing of the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) in the progressive care unit (PCU) population was found in the literature. Knowledge in this area will advance nurses’ ability to identify those at risk for falls and therefore implement measures to prevent falls and injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the MFS and describe and correlate the factors of the MFS with falls in a sample of PCU patients at a large county hospital.   Methods Following Institutional Review Board approval, data were collected prospectively for three months for this descriptive correlational study. Charts were reviewed for MFS scores at admission for patients meeting the inclusion criteria. Results A total of 913 subjects were included in the sample. Age ranged from 18 to 95 years; the majority of subjects were male and Caucasian. Twenty-four patients fell once leaving 889 nonfallers. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for each total score on the MFS. Chi-square revealed a marginally significant relationship between falling and secondary diagnosis and falling and mental status. Discussion Data were not sufficient to change the risk level score ranges (low, moderate, and high risk for falling); therefore, focus shifted to the relationship between falling and mental status. A review of the hospital’s interventions for each fall risk level led the researchers to notice no interventions were listed to assess the patient’s mental status or what to do next once the status was known. This information was given to the appropriate hospital committee for review. Conclusions On-going reviews and analysis of current prevention programs in individual units in each hospital globally are a necessary part of the process to improve patient outcomes and save dollars.en_GB
dc.subjectprogressive care uniten_GB
dc.subjectMorse Fall Scaleen_GB
dc.subjectfallsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:12:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:12:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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