Social Support, Social Stigma, Coping and Quality of Life in Older Gay Men with HIV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202157
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Support, Social Stigma, Coping and Quality of Life in Older Gay Men with HIV
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, people with HIV are living longer and now managing their infection as any other chronic disease.  As such, quality of life, and not just health, has emerged as an important issue for older adults with HIV.  Persons aged 50 and older account for 24% of persons living with HIV in the U.S., with gay men still comprising the largest portion.  Recent studies suggest that older HIV-positive adults have fewer social support networks and experience more stigma than older HIV-negative adults and younger HIV-positive adults, leading to poorer perceived health and quality of life.  The purpose of this study was to explore social support, social stigma, coping, perceived health and quality of life in older gay men with HIV, based on the theory of stress, appraisal, and coping by Lazarus and Folkman.  The study consisted of 75 gay men aged 50 and older with HIV living in the Southeastern United States.  Participants completed a 45-minute survey including demographic information and standardized measures for social support, social stigma (including internalized homonegativity, HIV stigma, and ageism), coping, perceived health, and quality of life.  Bivariate analysis was used to determine relationships between demographics and study variables.  Stepwise linear regression was used to determine correlates for coping methods and for perceived health and quality of life.  An understanding of social support, perceived social stigma, and coping and their relationship with perceived health and quality of life for older gay men with HIV will be an essential first step toward designing and testing interventions aimed at increasing health and quality of life in this population. (Author’s Note: The study is ongoing but will be completed by May 2010.)
Keywords:
Coping; HIV/AIDS; Stigma
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Support, Social Stigma, Coping and Quality of Life in Older Gay Men with HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202157-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, people with HIV are living longer and now managing their infection as any other chronic disease.  As such, quality of life, and not just health, has emerged as an important issue for older adults with HIV.  Persons aged 50 and older account for 24% of persons living with HIV in the U.S., with gay men still comprising the largest portion.  Recent studies suggest that older HIV-positive adults have fewer social support networks and experience more stigma than older HIV-negative adults and younger HIV-positive adults, leading to poorer perceived health and quality of life.  The purpose of this study was to explore social support, social stigma, coping, perceived health and quality of life in older gay men with HIV, based on the theory of stress, appraisal, and coping by Lazarus and Folkman.  The study consisted of 75 gay men aged 50 and older with HIV living in the Southeastern United States.  Participants completed a 45-minute survey including demographic information and standardized measures for social support, social stigma (including internalized homonegativity, HIV stigma, and ageism), coping, perceived health, and quality of life.  Bivariate analysis was used to determine relationships between demographics and study variables.  Stepwise linear regression was used to determine correlates for coping methods and for perceived health and quality of life.  An understanding of social support, perceived social stigma, and coping and their relationship with perceived health and quality of life for older gay men with HIV will be an essential first step toward designing and testing interventions aimed at increasing health and quality of life in this population. (Author’s Note: The study is ongoing but will be completed by May 2010.)en_GB
dc.subjectCopingen_GB
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.subjectStigmaen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:13:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:13:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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