An Evidence-Based Practice Project to Improve Securement and Visualization of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202159
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evidence-Based Practice Project to Improve Securement and Visualization of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters in Pediatric Patients
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Problem:  Securement and visualization of peripheral intravenous catheter sites (PIV) is a common problem for pediatric nurses worldwide because infiltration of IV fluid can lead to serious complications.  Quality data, staff nurse, and nursing administration concerns about lack of visualization of PIV sites led to the need to identify best evidence for securing PIVs so they could be easily assessed. An evidence-based practice (EBP) team representing a wide variety of units was assembled to conduct the project. EBP Model: The IOWA Model of EBP was used to guide the project. Method: The team conducted a comprehensive search of on-line databases locating over 30 research and non-research articles. Following critique and synthesis, the team identified key EBP: 1) use of clear dressings & tape, 2) use of catheter stabilization devices, 3) use of IV protectors, 4) labeling of dressings, &  5) hourly rounding to assess PIVs. A baseline audit of 90 PIVs on varying units identified the following current practice: 40% of the PIV sites were not visible, clear dressings were only used 40% of time, IV protectors were used in 11.7% of the PIVs, no catheter stabilization devices were used, and mean duration of PIV was 38.2 hrs. A pilot to test the evidence change in practice was implemented on 65 PIVs on 2 medical surgical units using an IV start kit manufactured to contain the EBP materials. Outcomes:  Following successful pilot testing and staff education, the new EBP bundle was initiated house wide. Outcomes 6 months post implementation indicated strong improvement in practice – 95% of sites were clearly or easily visible, IV protectors used in 81% of IVs, clear dressings used 92%, catheter stabilization devices used 74%, and mean duration of IV increased to 62.9 hrs.  IV infiltration data indicated decreasing severity with earlier recognition and removal of IVs.  
Keywords:
EBP; intravenous lines; pediatric
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evidence-Based Practice Project to Improve Securement and Visualization of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters in Pediatric Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202159-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Problem:  Securement and visualization of peripheral intravenous catheter sites (PIV) is a common problem for pediatric nurses worldwide because infiltration of IV fluid can lead to serious complications.  Quality data, staff nurse, and nursing administration concerns about lack of visualization of PIV sites led to the need to identify best evidence for securing PIVs so they could be easily assessed. An evidence-based practice (EBP) team representing a wide variety of units was assembled to conduct the project. EBP Model: The IOWA Model of EBP was used to guide the project. Method: The team conducted a comprehensive search of on-line databases locating over 30 research and non-research articles. Following critique and synthesis, the team identified key EBP: 1) use of clear dressings & tape, 2) use of catheter stabilization devices, 3) use of IV protectors, 4) labeling of dressings, &  5) hourly rounding to assess PIVs. A baseline audit of 90 PIVs on varying units identified the following current practice: 40% of the PIV sites were not visible, clear dressings were only used 40% of time, IV protectors were used in 11.7% of the PIVs, no catheter stabilization devices were used, and mean duration of PIV was 38.2 hrs. A pilot to test the evidence change in practice was implemented on 65 PIVs on 2 medical surgical units using an IV start kit manufactured to contain the EBP materials. Outcomes:  Following successful pilot testing and staff education, the new EBP bundle was initiated house wide. Outcomes 6 months post implementation indicated strong improvement in practice – 95% of sites were clearly or easily visible, IV protectors used in 81% of IVs, clear dressings used 92%, catheter stabilization devices used 74%, and mean duration of IV increased to 62.9 hrs.  IV infiltration data indicated decreasing severity with earlier recognition and removal of IVs.  en_GB
dc.subjectEBPen_GB
dc.subjectintravenous linesen_GB
dc.subjectpediatricen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:13:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:13:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.