Nurses' Perceptions of Smoking Cessation Interventions In Prenatal Clinics

8.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202170
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceptions of Smoking Cessation Interventions In Prenatal Clinics
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Smoking during pregnancy is the single greatest modifiable factor that negatively affects the mother and fetus during pregnancy. Despite targeted interventions, approximately 20% of women residing in central Pennsylvania reported smoking in the last 3 months of pregnancy; this rate has changed little over 10-years of data tracking. Although cessation counseling is integrated into each prenatal care visit, current approaches do not effectively assist a subset of pregnant smokers. This study explored nurses’ opinions, experiences and observations surrounding smoking cessation interventions with pregnant patients.  The study methods included three distinct phases. Focus groups with nurses were conducted to identify the salient issues and experiences around cessation interventions in prenatal clinics. The derived understandings were used to develop a 31-item Likert-scale survey specific to prenatal nursing and cessation interventions. Electronic data were accessed to examine the characteristics of women who smoked during pregnancy and the impact of nurse-provided cessation interventions throughout the duration of prenatal care. Twenty-nine staff, primarily RNs, participated in 7 focus groups conducted over a 5-week period. Several themes repeated across discussions: awareness of vulnerable situations, nurses’ personal cessation strategies, effective and desired tools, and constraints related to clinic settings. Completed surveys were submitted by 83% of the nursing staff; pregnant smokers were portrayed as a vulnerable population, for whom established cessation strategies were rarely effective. Self-ratings of cessation counseling skills were related to perceived effectiveness of cessation training. Retrospective data supported nurses’ perceptions of pregnant smokers’ characteristics and cessation rates during pregnancy. The findings suggest that, for some pregnant smokers, successful cessation requires expanded interventions. This study has motivated activities to strengthen nurse-physician collaboration and partnerships with community-based resources to promote cessation and smoke-free homes. A pilot program is underway, examining the impact of coordinated massages across prenatal, childbirth and pediatric settings.   
Keywords:
prenatal care; Smoking cessation interventions
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceptions of Smoking Cessation Interventions In Prenatal Clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202170-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Smoking during pregnancy is the single greatest modifiable factor that negatively affects the mother and fetus during pregnancy. Despite targeted interventions, approximately 20% of women residing in central Pennsylvania reported smoking in the last 3 months of pregnancy; this rate has changed little over 10-years of data tracking. Although cessation counseling is integrated into each prenatal care visit, current approaches do not effectively assist a subset of pregnant smokers. This study explored nurses’ opinions, experiences and observations surrounding smoking cessation interventions with pregnant patients.  The study methods included three distinct phases. Focus groups with nurses were conducted to identify the salient issues and experiences around cessation interventions in prenatal clinics. The derived understandings were used to develop a 31-item Likert-scale survey specific to prenatal nursing and cessation interventions. Electronic data were accessed to examine the characteristics of women who smoked during pregnancy and the impact of nurse-provided cessation interventions throughout the duration of prenatal care. Twenty-nine staff, primarily RNs, participated in 7 focus groups conducted over a 5-week period. Several themes repeated across discussions: awareness of vulnerable situations, nurses’ personal cessation strategies, effective and desired tools, and constraints related to clinic settings. Completed surveys were submitted by 83% of the nursing staff; pregnant smokers were portrayed as a vulnerable population, for whom established cessation strategies were rarely effective. Self-ratings of cessation counseling skills were related to perceived effectiveness of cessation training. Retrospective data supported nurses’ perceptions of pregnant smokers’ characteristics and cessation rates during pregnancy. The findings suggest that, for some pregnant smokers, successful cessation requires expanded interventions. This study has motivated activities to strengthen nurse-physician collaboration and partnerships with community-based resources to promote cessation and smoke-free homes. A pilot program is underway, examining the impact of coordinated massages across prenatal, childbirth and pediatric settings.   en_GB
dc.subjectprenatal careen_GB
dc.subjectSmoking cessation interventionsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:13:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:13:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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