Health Disparities and Breastfeeding in the African-American Population: A Literature Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202174
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Disparities and Breastfeeding in the African-American Population: A Literature Review
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: A review of literature is presented regarding health disparities experienced by African Americans in the United States, as well as research regarding the protective benefits of breastfeeding for those specific health disparities. Factors that influence breastfeeding intentions, initiation, and duration in the African American population are also presented.   Problem and Significance: African Americans in the United States have higher risk for many diseases, and higher incidences of many chronic health conditions that lead to poor health outcomes when compared to white and Hispanic/Latino populations including.  Evidence in the literature strongly suggests that breastfeeding could have a positive impact on reducing many health disparities experienced by African Americans; yet, African American women continue to be the least likely population to engage in breastfeeding in the United States. Review of Literature: The review of literature revealed five focus areas of importance to African American women and breastfeeding including: disparity of information regarding breastfeeding relayed by health care providers, factors affecting prenatal breastfeeding intentions, factors affecting initiation and duration of breastfeeding, community and institutional interventions related to breastfeeding duration, and weakness of breastfeeding promotional campaigns targeted to the African American population.      Implications for Research: The Sequential Consensual Qualitative Design (Groleau et al., 2009) is a qualitative methodology proposed to explore the breastfeeding experiences of African American women.  This three stage design encourages an ethnocentric focus that exclusively explores African American women’s breastfeeding experiences with the aim of discovering not simply what, but how and why certain cultural and environmental factors affect the breastfeeding decisions made by African American women. Groleau, D., Zelkowitx, P., & Cabral, I.V. (2009). Enhancing generalizability: Moving from an intimate to a political voice. Qualitative Health Research, 19(3), 416-426.
Keywords:
Health disparities; Breastfeeding; African American
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Disparities and Breastfeeding in the African-American Population: A Literature Reviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202174-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: A review of literature is presented regarding health disparities experienced by African Americans in the United States, as well as research regarding the protective benefits of breastfeeding for those specific health disparities. Factors that influence breastfeeding intentions, initiation, and duration in the African American population are also presented.   Problem and Significance: African Americans in the United States have higher risk for many diseases, and higher incidences of many chronic health conditions that lead to poor health outcomes when compared to white and Hispanic/Latino populations including.  Evidence in the literature strongly suggests that breastfeeding could have a positive impact on reducing many health disparities experienced by African Americans; yet, African American women continue to be the least likely population to engage in breastfeeding in the United States. Review of Literature: The review of literature revealed five focus areas of importance to African American women and breastfeeding including: disparity of information regarding breastfeeding relayed by health care providers, factors affecting prenatal breastfeeding intentions, factors affecting initiation and duration of breastfeeding, community and institutional interventions related to breastfeeding duration, and weakness of breastfeeding promotional campaigns targeted to the African American population.      Implications for Research: The Sequential Consensual Qualitative Design (Groleau et al., 2009) is a qualitative methodology proposed to explore the breastfeeding experiences of African American women.  This three stage design encourages an ethnocentric focus that exclusively explores African American women’s breastfeeding experiences with the aim of discovering not simply what, but how and why certain cultural and environmental factors affect the breastfeeding decisions made by African American women. Groleau, D., Zelkowitx, P., & Cabral, I.V. (2009). Enhancing generalizability: Moving from an intimate to a political voice. Qualitative Health Research, 19(3), 416-426.en_GB
dc.subjectHealth disparitiesen_GB
dc.subjectBreastfeedingen_GB
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:14:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:14:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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