Leading the Transformation of Community/Public Health Nursing in a Baccalaureate Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202177
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leading the Transformation of Community/Public Health Nursing in a Baccalaureate Program
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The initial catalyst for this project was the decision to establish a community health nursing capstone course. The competition of for-profit nursing programs, online bachelor’s degree completion programs, and transition of community colleges to state colleges offering baccalaureate degrees posed other aspects for consideration in the change. This project was an opportunity for the novice educator to experience, firsthand, principles of leadership under the guidance of a mentor. Through clarification of values and examples set by the mentor, the scholar sought to envision the future for the course and to enlist the help of others in the transition.  Data were obtained from faculty members experienced in teaching the community health nursing course, students who had taken the course and community partners who provide the clinical experiences. Understanding the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the existing course was instrumental in assisting the scholar in identifying a shared vision for the transformed course. In discovering innovative ways in which the course could be changed to meet competing needs, the scholar experienced many lessons. Learning to outsource aspects of the research process to those whose role it is to assist faculty; the development of time management skills that better balanced the teaching, scholarship and service requirements of the scholar’s faculty role; and finding a voice to express ideas are examples of the knowledge gained by learning to accept guidance from a mentor. The relationships that have been built or strengthened through the process of gathering data for the project will inform the transformation of the course. The scholar’s mentored leadership journey will serve to ensure the needs of the students; faculty and community partners will be met.  More importantly, the scholar has learned to maintain a relationship with a mentor while looking for future opportunities to encourage the heart of others.
Keywords:
Change; Community Partners; Community Health Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeading the Transformation of Community/Public Health Nursing in a Baccalaureate Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202177-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The initial catalyst for this project was the decision to establish a community health nursing capstone course. The competition of for-profit nursing programs, online bachelor’s degree completion programs, and transition of community colleges to state colleges offering baccalaureate degrees posed other aspects for consideration in the change. This project was an opportunity for the novice educator to experience, firsthand, principles of leadership under the guidance of a mentor. Through clarification of values and examples set by the mentor, the scholar sought to envision the future for the course and to enlist the help of others in the transition.  Data were obtained from faculty members experienced in teaching the community health nursing course, students who had taken the course and community partners who provide the clinical experiences. Understanding the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the existing course was instrumental in assisting the scholar in identifying a shared vision for the transformed course. In discovering innovative ways in which the course could be changed to meet competing needs, the scholar experienced many lessons. Learning to outsource aspects of the research process to those whose role it is to assist faculty; the development of time management skills that better balanced the teaching, scholarship and service requirements of the scholar’s faculty role; and finding a voice to express ideas are examples of the knowledge gained by learning to accept guidance from a mentor. The relationships that have been built or strengthened through the process of gathering data for the project will inform the transformation of the course. The scholar’s mentored leadership journey will serve to ensure the needs of the students; faculty and community partners will be met.  More importantly, the scholar has learned to maintain a relationship with a mentor while looking for future opportunities to encourage the heart of others.en_GB
dc.subjectChangeen_GB
dc.subjectCommunity Partnersen_GB
dc.subjectCommunity Health Nursingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:14:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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