A Descriptive Pilot Study of the Effects of Recreational Activities on the Behavior, Mood and Level of Function of Geriatric Dementia Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202179
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Descriptive Pilot Study of the Effects of Recreational Activities on the Behavior, Mood and Level of Function of Geriatric Dementia Patients
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic activities on patients in a 21-bed inpatient geriatric/medical psychiatry unit. It was hypothesized that attendance at activities would decrease the need for PRN medications and improve scores on the Geriatric Profile (GP), a general measure of patient functioning. It was also anticipated that sleep behavior would improve and staff use of restraints and seclusion would decrease. Methodology: This study followed a case series design in conjunction with descriptive and comparative methodologies. Data was collected using the GP and chart review. A convenience sample of 23 patients, 65-90 years of age, with a diagnosis of dementia, with or without other medical or psychiatric diagnoses were subjects of the study. Approval from the IRB was obtained. Results: Forty-two groups were offered from 3-5 PM and 39 groups from 6-8 PM. Activities included: Pet Therapy, Reminiscence, Sing-a-longs, Games, Art and Humor, amongst others. The results for sleep behavior (X2=8.275, p=.003) and restraint/seclusion (X2=9.145, p=.005) were statistically significant, but in lack of support for the hypothesis. Attendance at recreational activities and PRN’s for sleep (X2=0.099, p=.75) or psychosis/agitation (X2=3.387, p=.06) showed no significant association. Three GP assessments were compared. The first on day of admission, the second at the midpoint of the subject’s stay, and the third on day of discharge. Independent samples tests revealed that there were significant differences between those who attended group activities 50% or more of their stay in regards to physical disability (p=.05), sociability (p=.03), general competence (p=.004) and confusion (p=.03). Discussion: The findings suggest that the recreational activities are a therapeutic and cost-effective non-pharmacological treatment for the difficult symptoms of dementia in geriatric patients. It is also possible to claim that group activities improve quality of life in this patient population.
Keywords:
Geriatric Inpatients; Dementia; Recreational Activities
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Descriptive Pilot Study of the Effects of Recreational Activities on the Behavior, Mood and Level of Function of Geriatric Dementia Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202179-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic activities on patients in a 21-bed inpatient geriatric/medical psychiatry unit. It was hypothesized that attendance at activities would decrease the need for PRN medications and improve scores on the Geriatric Profile (GP), a general measure of patient functioning. It was also anticipated that sleep behavior would improve and staff use of restraints and seclusion would decrease. Methodology: This study followed a case series design in conjunction with descriptive and comparative methodologies. Data was collected using the GP and chart review. A convenience sample of 23 patients, 65-90 years of age, with a diagnosis of dementia, with or without other medical or psychiatric diagnoses were subjects of the study. Approval from the IRB was obtained. Results: Forty-two groups were offered from 3-5 PM and 39 groups from 6-8 PM. Activities included: Pet Therapy, Reminiscence, Sing-a-longs, Games, Art and Humor, amongst others. The results for sleep behavior (X2=8.275, p=.003) and restraint/seclusion (X2=9.145, p=.005) were statistically significant, but in lack of support for the hypothesis. Attendance at recreational activities and PRN’s for sleep (X2=0.099, p=.75) or psychosis/agitation (X2=3.387, p=.06) showed no significant association. Three GP assessments were compared. The first on day of admission, the second at the midpoint of the subject’s stay, and the third on day of discharge. Independent samples tests revealed that there were significant differences between those who attended group activities 50% or more of their stay in regards to physical disability (p=.05), sociability (p=.03), general competence (p=.004) and confusion (p=.03). Discussion: The findings suggest that the recreational activities are a therapeutic and cost-effective non-pharmacological treatment for the difficult symptoms of dementia in geriatric patients. It is also possible to claim that group activities improve quality of life in this patient population.en_GB
dc.subjectGeriatric Inpatientsen_GB
dc.subjectDementiaen_GB
dc.subjectRecreational Activitiesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:14:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:14:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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