Partnering for Success: Clinical Nurse Leaders Initiate and Sustain Unit Level Practice Changes in Quality and Safety

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202206
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Partnering for Success: Clinical Nurse Leaders Initiate and Sustain Unit Level Practice Changes in Quality and Safety
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Demands to demonstrate evidence-based improvements are growing yet sustaining practice change is elusive. Trinity Health (TH) partnered with University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) to implement a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) program with a shared goal to co-create curriculum to support organizational learning. Students were expected to address existing practice concerns using system tools, resources, and practice experts in their organization. CNL work was made visible through expectation of full participation of interdisciplinary staff in the projects. Methods Trinity Health embraced Process Excellence, a quality improvement philosophy that expands single process improvements to develop an appreciation for systems. An opportunity for collaboration in the development of Quality and Leadership courses was identified. Each course required 100 clinical hours in support of CNL led process improvements. TH provided a 2 day in-service on Process Excellence/Lean to supplement course content. Nursing leaders identified 19 organizational concerns that might benefit from CNL led quality improvement projects. Twelve projects were developed with quality improvement staff serving as project coaches mentoring students in the DMAIC process. Results Each semester students presented to classmates, nursing leaders, and project participants. Feedback was positive and many commented on the progress made in a short time given the long standing issues that were addressed. Unintended benefits of these projects were informal mentoring relationships developed with quality improvement and finance staff as CNLs defined metrics and cost benefits. Of the 12 projects initiated, 8 have been sustained for 18 months. Half have been revised for ongoing improvement.   Conclusion This pilot offered a re-shaping of the organizations approach to quality improvement and the norms of team members engaged in process improvement activities. CNL led teams addressed ‘real problems’ using a systematic approach to quality improvement. Organizational learning has occurred and staff members are identifying issues that would benefit from CNL involvement.  
Keywords:
quality improvement; organizational learning; clinical nurse leaders
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePartnering for Success: Clinical Nurse Leaders Initiate and Sustain Unit Level Practice Changes in Quality and Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202206-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Demands to demonstrate evidence-based improvements are growing yet sustaining practice change is elusive. Trinity Health (TH) partnered with University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) to implement a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) program with a shared goal to co-create curriculum to support organizational learning. Students were expected to address existing practice concerns using system tools, resources, and practice experts in their organization. CNL work was made visible through expectation of full participation of interdisciplinary staff in the projects. Methods Trinity Health embraced Process Excellence, a quality improvement philosophy that expands single process improvements to develop an appreciation for systems. An opportunity for collaboration in the development of Quality and Leadership courses was identified. Each course required 100 clinical hours in support of CNL led process improvements. TH provided a 2 day in-service on Process Excellence/Lean to supplement course content. Nursing leaders identified 19 organizational concerns that might benefit from CNL led quality improvement projects. Twelve projects were developed with quality improvement staff serving as project coaches mentoring students in the DMAIC process. Results Each semester students presented to classmates, nursing leaders, and project participants. Feedback was positive and many commented on the progress made in a short time given the long standing issues that were addressed. Unintended benefits of these projects were informal mentoring relationships developed with quality improvement and finance staff as CNLs defined metrics and cost benefits. Of the 12 projects initiated, 8 have been sustained for 18 months. Half have been revised for ongoing improvement.   Conclusion This pilot offered a re-shaping of the organizations approach to quality improvement and the norms of team members engaged in process improvement activities. CNL led teams addressed ‘real problems’ using a systematic approach to quality improvement. Organizational learning has occurred and staff members are identifying issues that would benefit from CNL involvement.  en_GB
dc.subjectquality improvementen_GB
dc.subjectorganizational learningen_GB
dc.subjectclinical nurse leadersen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:15:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:15:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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