Caring for the Dying and Being in the World: A Study of End-of-Life Pedagogy in a School of Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202213
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring for the Dying and Being in the World: A Study of End-of-Life Pedagogy in a School of Nursing
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose     A descriptive study was undertaken to explore whether nursing alumni from 2001-2007 perceive that the EOL education in their undergraduate curriculum has: 1) prepared them to provide quality end of life (EOL) care and, 2) contributed to changes in the way they go about being in the world. ‘Changes in being in the world’ was defined as being more or less appreciative of things in life, for example, spending more time with loved ones. Method After IRB approval, alumni were sent a survey consisting of demographic and likert-type questions specific to their EOL education. One hundred and fifty four graduates responded (100 generic and 54 RN to BSN pathway alumni; 133 females, and 21 males) who were similarly representative of our culturally diverse urban public university population as a whole. Participants comprised a varied group of nurses in terms of number of years in practice and clinical background.  Results Analysis of variance (ANOVA) models were used to statistically assess differences in group responses.  Findings revealed statistically significant differences between those alumni who took an EOL elective and those who had received basic education related to their perceptions of preparedness to provide care (F (1,152) = 51.85, p < .0001, M-elective = 3.43 and M-no elective = 2.60; where 4 = strongly agree and 1 strongly disagree) and also ways of being in the world (F (1,152) = 19.50, p < .0001, M-elective = 3.28 and M-no elective = 2.73).  Conclusion Over 55 % of respondents believed that they had not received enough EOL content and this in a school with strong advocacy for EOL education. The findings also revealed a number of barriers related to EOL education that bear further scrutiny to ensure that nurses are adequately prepared to provide quality care to the dying and their loved ones.
Keywords:
end of life care education; dying and death
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring for the Dying and Being in the World: A Study of End-of-Life Pedagogy in a School of Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202213-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose     A descriptive study was undertaken to explore whether nursing alumni from 2001-2007 perceive that the EOL education in their undergraduate curriculum has: 1) prepared them to provide quality end of life (EOL) care and, 2) contributed to changes in the way they go about being in the world. ‘Changes in being in the world’ was defined as being more or less appreciative of things in life, for example, spending more time with loved ones. Method After IRB approval, alumni were sent a survey consisting of demographic and likert-type questions specific to their EOL education. One hundred and fifty four graduates responded (100 generic and 54 RN to BSN pathway alumni; 133 females, and 21 males) who were similarly representative of our culturally diverse urban public university population as a whole. Participants comprised a varied group of nurses in terms of number of years in practice and clinical background.  Results Analysis of variance (ANOVA) models were used to statistically assess differences in group responses.  Findings revealed statistically significant differences between those alumni who took an EOL elective and those who had received basic education related to their perceptions of preparedness to provide care (F (1,152) = 51.85, p < .0001, M-elective = 3.43 and M-no elective = 2.60; where 4 = strongly agree and 1 strongly disagree) and also ways of being in the world (F (1,152) = 19.50, p < .0001, M-elective = 3.28 and M-no elective = 2.73).  Conclusion Over 55 % of respondents believed that they had not received enough EOL content and this in a school with strong advocacy for EOL education. The findings also revealed a number of barriers related to EOL education that bear further scrutiny to ensure that nurses are adequately prepared to provide quality care to the dying and their loved ones.en_GB
dc.subjectend of life care educationen_GB
dc.subjectdying and deathen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:16:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:16:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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