An Examination of the Effectiveness of Supporting Self-Help Groups for Expectant Brazilian Females Residing in Japan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202224
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Examination of the Effectiveness of Supporting Self-Help Groups for Expectant Brazilian Females Residing in Japan
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: By not attending maternity classes, Brazilian women in Japan become isolated. This study aimed to implement and analyze the effectiveness of ongoing maternal networking events prompting interaction between participants. Methods: Nine events for expectant Brazilian women in ‘A’ Prefecture were held April-August 2010. Activities included explanations using Portuguese texts, in accordance with participants’ wishes. Analysis was carried out using a qualitative, inductive method, with consent obtained from the Shiga University of Medical Science Ethics Committee. Results: The actual number of participants consisted of 8 expectant women (3 primiparous and 5 parous), 1 parturient woman (1 primiparous), 8 spouses and 8 children; the total number comprised of 14 expectant women, 13 spouses and 11 children. Analysis and categorization was carried out based on field notes taken during the events. Prior to participation, comments included they “would attend physical examinations and events with their spouse/children,” “could not envisage a networking event so were unenthusiastic” and “would manage somehow.” During participation, they “thought it good to learn something prior to childbirth” and “wanted to know about pregnancy, childcare and the system.” After participation, they “wanted to hurry home after the physical examination due to family plans,”and “might ask for advice postpartum.” Conclusion: Before the events, participants appeared reluctant to attend, but upon participation, they gained information and recognized the value of preparing for childbirth. Some expressed the wish for postpartum advice, and their preparedness for giving birth in Japan increased. However, only two sets of participants attended more than once; therefore prompting interaction to the point of a functional self-help group did not occur. This may be attributable to demanding schedules as foreign laborers, or to social values that it was important to spend days off as a family. The results show the need to consider further useful care.
Keywords:
transcultural nursing; support groups; expectant Brazilian women
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Examination of the Effectiveness of Supporting Self-Help Groups for Expectant Brazilian Females Residing in Japanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202224-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: By not attending maternity classes, Brazilian women in Japan become isolated. This study aimed to implement and analyze the effectiveness of ongoing maternal networking events prompting interaction between participants. Methods: Nine events for expectant Brazilian women in ‘A’ Prefecture were held April-August 2010. Activities included explanations using Portuguese texts, in accordance with participants’ wishes. Analysis was carried out using a qualitative, inductive method, with consent obtained from the Shiga University of Medical Science Ethics Committee. Results: The actual number of participants consisted of 8 expectant women (3 primiparous and 5 parous), 1 parturient woman (1 primiparous), 8 spouses and 8 children; the total number comprised of 14 expectant women, 13 spouses and 11 children. Analysis and categorization was carried out based on field notes taken during the events. Prior to participation, comments included they “would attend physical examinations and events with their spouse/children,” “could not envisage a networking event so were unenthusiastic” and “would manage somehow.” During participation, they “thought it good to learn something prior to childbirth” and “wanted to know about pregnancy, childcare and the system.” After participation, they “wanted to hurry home after the physical examination due to family plans,”and “might ask for advice postpartum.” Conclusion: Before the events, participants appeared reluctant to attend, but upon participation, they gained information and recognized the value of preparing for childbirth. Some expressed the wish for postpartum advice, and their preparedness for giving birth in Japan increased. However, only two sets of participants attended more than once; therefore prompting interaction to the point of a functional self-help group did not occur. This may be attributable to demanding schedules as foreign laborers, or to social values that it was important to spend days off as a family. The results show the need to consider further useful care.en_GB
dc.subjecttranscultural nursingen_GB
dc.subjectsupport groupsen_GB
dc.subjectexpectant Brazilian womenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:16:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:16:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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