2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202226
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Urinary Catheters in Cesearean Delivery: What's the Harm?
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention)        The purpose of the research was to explore the question, "Is there a relationship between selected maternal variables, and the length of time an indwelling catheter is in place for women recovering from cesarean section delivery?"  The urinary outcomes measured are urinary retention and urinary tract infections.  A prospective correlation study using chart review was conducted over a ten-month period between February and December 2009, at a teaching hospital in Washington, D.C.  The methods used included a data collection sheet completed by the nursing staff and chart review.  The results were that urinary catheters were left in over 24 hours (M=25.44), despite a postpartum range order directive to remove the urinary catheter 12-24 hours post Cesarean section.  The length of time urinary catheters were left in place postoperatively was not associated with either urinary retention or the risk of developing a urinary tract infection.        Further research is needed to identify the impact of catheter use on other outcomes such as ambulation, pain control, self-care, and bonding.
Keywords:
Cesarean Section; Postpartum Urinary Retention; Urinary Catheters
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUrinary Catheters in Cesearean Delivery: What's the Harm?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202226-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention)        The purpose of the research was to explore the question, "Is there a relationship between selected maternal variables, and the length of time an indwelling catheter is in place for women recovering from cesarean section delivery?"  The urinary outcomes measured are urinary retention and urinary tract infections.  A prospective correlation study using chart review was conducted over a ten-month period between February and December 2009, at a teaching hospital in Washington, D.C.  The methods used included a data collection sheet completed by the nursing staff and chart review.  The results were that urinary catheters were left in over 24 hours (M=25.44), despite a postpartum range order directive to remove the urinary catheter 12-24 hours post Cesarean section.  The length of time urinary catheters were left in place postoperatively was not associated with either urinary retention or the risk of developing a urinary tract infection.        Further research is needed to identify the impact of catheter use on other outcomes such as ambulation, pain control, self-care, and bonding.en_GB
dc.subjectCesarean Sectionen_GB
dc.subjectPostpartum Urinary Retentionen_GB
dc.subjectUrinary Cathetersen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:16:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:16:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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