Political Participation of Registered Nurses and Factors Influencing Participation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Political Participation of Registered Nurses and Factors Influencing Participation
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) U.S. registered nurses (RNs) are 2.6 million strong yet there is limited data about their political participation (US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009). Using the Civic Voluntarism Model (Verba, Schlozman, & Brady, 1995), this descriptive, predictive study measured political involvement of RNs, and factors affecting their participation including resources, psychological engagement, and recruitment networks. A sample of 468 RNs from the Midwest completed a 79 item on-line survey (Cronbach’s ?= .95). Psychological engagement was most predictive of political participation with the dimensions of political interest, political efficacy, and political information/knowledge highly significant. While respondents reported it was important for nurses to know about political issues (86%), only 40% felt they could impact local decisions and fewer felt they could impact state or national government decisions (32%).  Nursing education did not strengthen engagement as most respondents (80%) indicated nursing courses lacked political content with little preparation for political participation. Similarly the regression model showed resources contributed to political participation with time/money most significant. There was no appreciable difference found, however, among those with caregiving responsibilities or student status.  Nurses engaged in primarily “low cost” activities (i.e., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials). Nurse educators and professional organizations must cultivate political interest, efficacy and knowledge among students and nurses.  Continuing education workshops to strengthen political interest, efficacy, and civic knowledge/skills are a priority while emphasizing activities with greatest impact for the least cost (i.e., communicating with legislators, use of social media, tracking healthcare legislation, and volunteer opportunities). The focus of education should be connecting personal actions with the potential to impact legislation resulting in enhanced personal efficacy, civic knowledge, and skills.  Ultimately, nurses’ input is needed to ensure that health policy is designed and implemented with expert knowledge of patient care. 
Keywords:
Civic Voluntarism Model; Political participation; Health Policy
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePolitical Participation of Registered Nurses and Factors Influencing Participationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202229-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) U.S. registered nurses (RNs) are 2.6 million strong yet there is limited data about their political participation (US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009). Using the Civic Voluntarism Model (Verba, Schlozman, & Brady, 1995), this descriptive, predictive study measured political involvement of RNs, and factors affecting their participation including resources, psychological engagement, and recruitment networks. A sample of 468 RNs from the Midwest completed a 79 item on-line survey (Cronbach’s ?= .95). Psychological engagement was most predictive of political participation with the dimensions of political interest, political efficacy, and political information/knowledge highly significant. While respondents reported it was important for nurses to know about political issues (86%), only 40% felt they could impact local decisions and fewer felt they could impact state or national government decisions (32%).  Nursing education did not strengthen engagement as most respondents (80%) indicated nursing courses lacked political content with little preparation for political participation. Similarly the regression model showed resources contributed to political participation with time/money most significant. There was no appreciable difference found, however, among those with caregiving responsibilities or student status.  Nurses engaged in primarily “low cost” activities (i.e., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials). Nurse educators and professional organizations must cultivate political interest, efficacy and knowledge among students and nurses.  Continuing education workshops to strengthen political interest, efficacy, and civic knowledge/skills are a priority while emphasizing activities with greatest impact for the least cost (i.e., communicating with legislators, use of social media, tracking healthcare legislation, and volunteer opportunities). The focus of education should be connecting personal actions with the potential to impact legislation resulting in enhanced personal efficacy, civic knowledge, and skills.  Ultimately, nurses’ input is needed to ensure that health policy is designed and implemented with expert knowledge of patient care. en_GB
dc.subjectCivic Voluntarism Modelen_GB
dc.subjectPolitical participationen_GB
dc.subjectHealth Policyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:17:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:17:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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