The Long Term Impact of a Service Learning Medical Mission Immersion on Nursing Student's Cultural Efficacy and Professional Identity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Long Term Impact of a Service Learning Medical Mission Immersion on Nursing Student's Cultural Efficacy and Professional Identity
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Service learning courses with medical mission immersions positively impact healthcare students.  Students find medical missions are “life-changing” experiences that promote appreciation for population needs, increase desire to participate in service learning activities and heightens one’s sense of volunteerism and civic responsibility (Amerson, 2010; Parsi & List, 2008; Bentley & Ellison, 2005; Nokes, et al 2005).  Previous research has focused on immediate evaluation of the service-learning experience, while less is known about sustainability over time. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore long term impact of a medical mission service learning immersion on nursing students’ cultural efficacy and professional identity. Nursing students who participated in a medical mission immersion experience at least one year previously were solicited to participate, IRB approval was obtained.  Students completed a demographic survey, responded to open-ended questions, and completed a survey modified from the Civic Attitudes and Skills Questionnaire (CASQ) which examines service learning outcomes including civic action, interpersonal and problem-solving skills, political awareness, leadership skills, social justice attitudes and diversity attitudes. The CASQ has good internal consistency (0.70-0.80) and test-retest correlations (0.70).  Thirty students were solicited to participate, response rate was 30%.  Data analysis using descriptive statistics to address sample demographics, civic action, problem-solving, political awareness, leadership, social justice attitudes and diversity attitudes along with identification of common themes is pending completion. References Amerson, R. (2010).   The impact of service learning on cultural competence.  Nursing Education             Perspective,31(1), 18-22. Bentley, R., & Ellison, K.J. (2005). Impact of a service-learning project on nursing students. Nursing Education Perspectives, 26(5), 287-290. Nokes, K. M., et al (2005). Does service-learning increase cultural competency, critical thinking, and civic engagement? Journal of Nursing Education, 44(2), 65-70. Parsi, K. & List, J. (2008).  Preparing medical students for the world: Service learning             and global health justice.  Medscape Journal of Medicine, 10 (11), 268
Keywords:
service learning; medical mission
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Long Term Impact of a Service Learning Medical Mission Immersion on Nursing Student's Cultural Efficacy and Professional Identityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202239-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Service learning courses with medical mission immersions positively impact healthcare students.  Students find medical missions are “life-changing” experiences that promote appreciation for population needs, increase desire to participate in service learning activities and heightens one’s sense of volunteerism and civic responsibility (Amerson, 2010; Parsi & List, 2008; Bentley & Ellison, 2005; Nokes, et al 2005).  Previous research has focused on immediate evaluation of the service-learning experience, while less is known about sustainability over time. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore long term impact of a medical mission service learning immersion on nursing students’ cultural efficacy and professional identity. Nursing students who participated in a medical mission immersion experience at least one year previously were solicited to participate, IRB approval was obtained.  Students completed a demographic survey, responded to open-ended questions, and completed a survey modified from the Civic Attitudes and Skills Questionnaire (CASQ) which examines service learning outcomes including civic action, interpersonal and problem-solving skills, political awareness, leadership skills, social justice attitudes and diversity attitudes. The CASQ has good internal consistency (0.70-0.80) and test-retest correlations (0.70).  Thirty students were solicited to participate, response rate was 30%.  Data analysis using descriptive statistics to address sample demographics, civic action, problem-solving, political awareness, leadership, social justice attitudes and diversity attitudes along with identification of common themes is pending completion. References Amerson, R. (2010).   The impact of service learning on cultural competence.  Nursing Education             Perspective,31(1), 18-22. Bentley, R., & Ellison, K.J. (2005). Impact of a service-learning project on nursing students. Nursing Education Perspectives, 26(5), 287-290. Nokes, K. M., et al (2005). Does service-learning increase cultural competency, critical thinking, and civic engagement? Journal of Nursing Education, 44(2), 65-70. Parsi, K. & List, J. (2008).  Preparing medical students for the world: Service learning             and global health justice.  Medscape Journal of Medicine, 10 (11), 268en_GB
dc.subjectservice learningen_GB
dc.subjectmedical missionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:17:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:17:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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