Effects of Anxiety Reducing Interventions on Performance Anxiety in New Graduates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202247
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Anxiety Reducing Interventions on Performance Anxiety in New Graduates
Author(s):
Washington, Georgita Tolbert
Author Details:
Georgita Tolbert Washington, PhD, RN-BC, MSN
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Every new nursing graduate is challenged to transition from student to professional nurse. This stressful situation�can bring about performance anxiety which�occurs when an individual is the focus of attention,�is in fear of being humiliated or embarrased, and has a�fear of interactions with others. These feelings occur only in certain situations such as when the new graduate is the focus of attention and is constantly being evaluated. The need to interact with other health care professionals, patients, and families can also create anxiety about performance. No studies were found to have examined this concept in graduate nurses. This session will describe the results of research designed to reduce performance anxiety. Use of cognitive behavioral therapy concepts, progressive muscle relaxation, and reflective journalingh as been shown to decrease performance in musicians and actors, but there have been no studies in new graduates, or with this combination of interventions. Peplau's theory of interpersonal relations suggests that relationships play an important role in mediating anxiety. Because the preceptor model is used very frequently, it is likely that relationships with preceptors and the perceived level of social support could influence the success of transition and managing performance anxieyty. Using a quasi-experimental, mixed methods design, the sample was drawn from 2 classes of new graduates from a 6-month nurse residency program. Participants self-administered instruments that measured performance anxiety, perceptions of social support from preceptors, and preceptor relationships. They were also asked to journal weekly. This study verified the presence and level of performance anxiety in this sample. Results revealed a decrease in performance anxiety in both the control and treatment groups. There was no significant influence of relationship or perception of social support on the level of performance anxiety. Performance anxiety did not appear to have a�negative�affect on the transition of these new graduates.
Keywords:
new graduates; performance anxiety
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Conference Date:
2011
Conference Name:
41st Biennial Convention: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Health
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Grapevine, Texas USA
Description:
41st Biennial Convention: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Health
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffects of Anxiety Reducing Interventions on Performance Anxiety in New Graduatesen
dc.contributor.authorWashington, Georgita Tolberten
dc.author.detailsGeorgita Tolbert Washington, PhD, RN-BC, MSNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202247-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Every new nursing graduate is challenged to transition from student to professional nurse. This stressful situation�can bring about performance anxiety which�occurs when an individual is the focus of attention,�is in fear of being humiliated or embarrased, and has a�fear of interactions with others. These feelings occur only in certain situations such as when the new graduate is the focus of attention and is constantly being evaluated. The need to interact with other health care professionals, patients, and families can also create anxiety about performance. No studies were found to have examined this concept in graduate nurses. This session will describe the results of research designed to reduce performance anxiety. Use of cognitive behavioral therapy concepts, progressive muscle relaxation, and reflective journalingh as been shown to decrease performance in musicians and actors, but there have been no studies in new graduates, or with this combination of interventions. Peplau's theory of interpersonal relations suggests that relationships play an important role in mediating anxiety. Because the preceptor model is used very frequently, it is likely that relationships with preceptors and the perceived level of social support could influence the success of transition and managing performance anxieyty. Using a quasi-experimental, mixed methods design, the sample was drawn from 2 classes of new graduates from a 6-month nurse residency program. Participants self-administered instruments that measured performance anxiety, perceptions of social support from preceptors, and preceptor relationships. They were also asked to journal weekly. This study verified the presence and level of performance anxiety in this sample. Results revealed a decrease in performance anxiety in both the control and treatment groups. There was no significant influence of relationship or perception of social support on the level of performance anxiety. Performance anxiety did not appear to have a�negative�affect on the transition of these new graduates.en
dc.subjectnew graduatesen
dc.subjectperformance anxietyen
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:18:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:18:01Z-
dc.conference.date2011en
dc.conference.name41st Biennial Convention: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Healthen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationGrapevine, Texas USAen
dc.description41st Biennial Convention: People and Knowledge: Connecting for Global Healthen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.-
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