Developing Global Leaders Through Mentorship of Doctoral Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202249
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Global Leaders Through Mentorship of Doctoral Students
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose:  A program designed for mentorship of doctoral students in a PhD in nursing program with a focus on culturally diverse/vulnerable populations will be desribed. The mentorship program which was designed using the Adapted Model of Institutional Support will be presented as a first step in the formation of tomorrow's global leaders.  Components of the model include 1) support from faculty, 2) opportunities for socialization with other PhD students and national and international professional leaders, 3) mentoring from PhD nurses, 4) financial aid, 5) technical support and 6) academic advising. Methods: Following IRB approval, data were collected over a four year period.  Open ended questions were used to determine areas of difficulty, types of support needed within different stages of the doctoral lprogram and the students' satisfaction with support.  Students were asked to describe experiences as proteges within mentoring relationships and to track mentoring activities.  Data were collected from each participant when first enrolled and then every year afterward.  Demographic data were collected to establish a profile of the participants. Results:  Of the 28 students who volunteered for the study, 12 graduated, 8 dropped out of the PhD program, and 8 continue in the program.  Four of the twelve graduates are members of a minority.  Most students found time management to be the greatest challenge, and credited family, peers, faculty and mentors as the most important factors for their success.  Some had mentors in the workplace; some had mentors within the College of Nursing, and many students gravitated toward course faculty.  Participation in national and international conferences provided networking opportunities for the future. Conclusions:  The mentoring program is based on the assuption that mentoring activities, along with academic programs, are instrumental in the development of nurse leaders in a global society.
Keywords:
Future leaders; Mentorship
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Global Leaders Through Mentorship of Doctoral Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202249-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose:  A program designed for mentorship of doctoral students in a PhD in nursing program with a focus on culturally diverse/vulnerable populations will be desribed. The mentorship program which was designed using the Adapted Model of Institutional Support will be presented as a first step in the formation of tomorrow's global leaders.  Components of the model include 1) support from faculty, 2) opportunities for socialization with other PhD students and national and international professional leaders, 3) mentoring from PhD nurses, 4) financial aid, 5) technical support and 6) academic advising. Methods: Following IRB approval, data were collected over a four year period.  Open ended questions were used to determine areas of difficulty, types of support needed within different stages of the doctoral lprogram and the students' satisfaction with support.  Students were asked to describe experiences as proteges within mentoring relationships and to track mentoring activities.  Data were collected from each participant when first enrolled and then every year afterward.  Demographic data were collected to establish a profile of the participants. Results:  Of the 28 students who volunteered for the study, 12 graduated, 8 dropped out of the PhD program, and 8 continue in the program.  Four of the twelve graduates are members of a minority.  Most students found time management to be the greatest challenge, and credited family, peers, faculty and mentors as the most important factors for their success.  Some had mentors in the workplace; some had mentors within the College of Nursing, and many students gravitated toward course faculty.  Participation in national and international conferences provided networking opportunities for the future. Conclusions:  The mentoring program is based on the assuption that mentoring activities, along with academic programs, are instrumental in the development of nurse leaders in a global society.en_GB
dc.subjectFuture leadersen_GB
dc.subjectMentorshipen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:18:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:18:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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