2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202278
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Marketing Strategies for New Nurse Educators
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Marketing Strategies for New Nurse Educators The current and long-term shortage of nurse educators challenges universities and colleges to fill vacant nurse educator positions during a time when there is a growing number of nursing student applicants. The implications of the shortage have captured the attention of many stakeholders requiring ongoing collaborative efforts. Nonprofit organizations, such as institutions of higher learning, operate within budgetary constraints. Leaders in nursing education need cost-effective marketing strategies for obtaining new nurse educators. Research-based evidence on marketing strategies is needed to provide direction for viable marketing efforts that show promise to yield beneficial marketing transactions. Purpose: The purpose of this national study (Wolgemuth, 2010) was to investigate exposure to and influence of specific marketing communication strategies on new nurse educators’ decisions to choose a nurse educator career path and a current teaching position. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive, comparative design was used for this quantitative investigation. Differences were explored in the effectiveness of publicity, advertising, and personal marketing communication strategies in influencing new nurse educators’ decisions to select nursing education as a career choice and their current nurse educator position. Results: The results indicated that personal marketing had, on average, significantly more influence than publicity or advertising, and publicity had on average, significantly more influence than advertising on both career decisions and on current educator position decisions. Conclusion: While all marketing strategies had influence on nurse educator decisions, based on this study’s findings, a school may yield, over time, better marketing results by increasing monies and efforts towards personal marketing, followed by increasing publicity. Fewer resources should be directed toward advertisements. Reference Wolgemuth, V. (2010). Marketing strategies influencing new nurse educators' decisions to choose a nurse educator career path and current teaching position (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest. (AAT 3407360)      
Keywords:
Relationships; Nurse Educator Shortage
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMarketing Strategies for New Nurse Educatorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202278-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Marketing Strategies for New Nurse Educators The current and long-term shortage of nurse educators challenges universities and colleges to fill vacant nurse educator positions during a time when there is a growing number of nursing student applicants. The implications of the shortage have captured the attention of many stakeholders requiring ongoing collaborative efforts. Nonprofit organizations, such as institutions of higher learning, operate within budgetary constraints. Leaders in nursing education need cost-effective marketing strategies for obtaining new nurse educators. Research-based evidence on marketing strategies is needed to provide direction for viable marketing efforts that show promise to yield beneficial marketing transactions. Purpose: The purpose of this national study (Wolgemuth, 2010) was to investigate exposure to and influence of specific marketing communication strategies on new nurse educators’ decisions to choose a nurse educator career path and a current teaching position. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive, comparative design was used for this quantitative investigation. Differences were explored in the effectiveness of publicity, advertising, and personal marketing communication strategies in influencing new nurse educators’ decisions to select nursing education as a career choice and their current nurse educator position. Results: The results indicated that personal marketing had, on average, significantly more influence than publicity or advertising, and publicity had on average, significantly more influence than advertising on both career decisions and on current educator position decisions. Conclusion: While all marketing strategies had influence on nurse educator decisions, based on this study’s findings, a school may yield, over time, better marketing results by increasing monies and efforts towards personal marketing, followed by increasing publicity. Fewer resources should be directed toward advertisements. Reference Wolgemuth, V. (2010). Marketing strategies influencing new nurse educators' decisions to choose a nurse educator career path and current teaching position (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest. (AAT 3407360)      en_GB
dc.subjectRelationshipsen_GB
dc.subjectNurse Educator Shortageen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:19:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:19:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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