The Exploration of Personal Identity as the Basis for Culturally Competent Professional Practice: The Cultural Shield Exercise

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202287
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Exploration of Personal Identity as the Basis for Culturally Competent Professional Practice: The Cultural Shield Exercise
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose:  Preparation of nurse leaders for the 21st Century requires teaching about both national and global health care given the growing ethnic diversity of the United States and cultural plurality of our world.  One of the foundational principles of trans-cultural nursing, designed to alleviate cultural ignorance and minimize “cultural shock”,  is to understand one’s own culture as the basis for exploration of other cultures (Leininger, 1970, 1978, 1995, 1997, 2006; Campinha-Bacote, 1999, 2000).  Construction of cultural patterns about what is “normal and not”, the basis of ethnocentricity, informs behavior and imposes action.  Thus for nursing health care professionals it is imperative to recognize personal values and beliefs that shape perception and practice  Methods: As an introduction to trans-cultural nursing, this educator asks her class of junior nursing students to construct a  “Cultural Shield” in which students perform a self-check and  answer key questions about their roots.  Examples of questions include: Name values taught in your family that you still consider important/that may have caused you conflict in interacting with others; Name negative messages taught when you were young regarding people who were different from you and your family; Write a slogan or expression often heard in your childhood that could serve as a family motto; Identify one filter or belief about health, health care or the health care system that you learned from your family of origin; How might that filter contribute to or prevent you from practicing culturally-sensitive nursing care?   Results: Describing their family stories allows these neophyte nursing professionals to explore and unearth stereotypical prejudices imprinted by their families of origin. Conclusion: In the process of constructing their heritage the students learn how often newly-discovered and varied belief systems contribute to “medico-centrism” and interfere with culturally competent and congruent care of people from diverse cultures.
Keywords:
Cultural Shield Exercise; Culturally Competent Care; Individual Cultural Identity
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Exploration of Personal Identity as the Basis for Culturally Competent Professional Practice: The Cultural Shield Exerciseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202287-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose:  Preparation of nurse leaders for the 21st Century requires teaching about both national and global health care given the growing ethnic diversity of the United States and cultural plurality of our world.  One of the foundational principles of trans-cultural nursing, designed to alleviate cultural ignorance and minimize “cultural shock”,  is to understand one’s own culture as the basis for exploration of other cultures (Leininger, 1970, 1978, 1995, 1997, 2006; Campinha-Bacote, 1999, 2000).  Construction of cultural patterns about what is “normal and not”, the basis of ethnocentricity, informs behavior and imposes action.  Thus for nursing health care professionals it is imperative to recognize personal values and beliefs that shape perception and practice  Methods: As an introduction to trans-cultural nursing, this educator asks her class of junior nursing students to construct a  “Cultural Shield” in which students perform a self-check and  answer key questions about their roots.  Examples of questions include: Name values taught in your family that you still consider important/that may have caused you conflict in interacting with others; Name negative messages taught when you were young regarding people who were different from you and your family; Write a slogan or expression often heard in your childhood that could serve as a family motto; Identify one filter or belief about health, health care or the health care system that you learned from your family of origin; How might that filter contribute to or prevent you from practicing culturally-sensitive nursing care?   Results: Describing their family stories allows these neophyte nursing professionals to explore and unearth stereotypical prejudices imprinted by their families of origin. Conclusion: In the process of constructing their heritage the students learn how often newly-discovered and varied belief systems contribute to “medico-centrism” and interfere with culturally competent and congruent care of people from diverse cultures.en_GB
dc.subjectCultural Shield Exerciseen_GB
dc.subjectCulturally Competent Careen_GB
dc.subjectIndividual Cultural Identityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:20:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:20:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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