Adaptation as Health: A Photovoice Study of Female Asian-Indian Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202288
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adaptation as Health: A Photovoice Study of Female Asian-Indian Students
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) For the 2008/09 academic year, the number of international students attending universities in the United States increased by 8%, to an all-time high of 671,616. India remains the leading country of origin for the eighth consecutive year. Because the immigration experience results in many physical and psychological stressors, it may have a significant effect on the health of these young adults.  Little is known specifically about the physical and emotional health needs of international students in general, or about Asian Indian students in particular. This qualitative descriptive study was participatory in philosophical orientation and involved a modification of photovoice method to explore health related beliefs and attitudes of international students studying in the US. The purpose was to discern the students’ views about how the immigration experience impacted their physical and emotional well-being.  Semi-structured questions and photographs taken by students were used to explore ways that the students promoted their personal health, dealt with illness, and coped with stressors in their daily lives.  The sample consisted of nine Asian Indian women enrolled as full-time graduate students. The study was conducted in two sessions, two weeks apart. Themes identified from the data analysis included the following: the perception of health as a life in balance; illness as   disharmony or disconnection with nature; the value of a continuous connection with family as a source of emotional support and health advice; and general frustration with student and local health services.  Photographs taken and discussed by participants reflected the centrality of religion in daily life; the connection with and appreciation of the natural world; frequent feelings of loneliness and isolation; and, the stress of meeting academic and familial expectations.  Implications for nursing point to the need for providing culturally sensitive health services, for facilitating adaptation to the new environment and fostering ties to home.
Keywords:
Photovoice; Health; International Students
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdaptation as Health: A Photovoice Study of Female Asian-Indian Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202288-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) For the 2008/09 academic year, the number of international students attending universities in the United States increased by 8%, to an all-time high of 671,616. India remains the leading country of origin for the eighth consecutive year. Because the immigration experience results in many physical and psychological stressors, it may have a significant effect on the health of these young adults.  Little is known specifically about the physical and emotional health needs of international students in general, or about Asian Indian students in particular. This qualitative descriptive study was participatory in philosophical orientation and involved a modification of photovoice method to explore health related beliefs and attitudes of international students studying in the US. The purpose was to discern the students’ views about how the immigration experience impacted their physical and emotional well-being.  Semi-structured questions and photographs taken by students were used to explore ways that the students promoted their personal health, dealt with illness, and coped with stressors in their daily lives.  The sample consisted of nine Asian Indian women enrolled as full-time graduate students. The study was conducted in two sessions, two weeks apart. Themes identified from the data analysis included the following: the perception of health as a life in balance; illness as   disharmony or disconnection with nature; the value of a continuous connection with family as a source of emotional support and health advice; and general frustration with student and local health services.  Photographs taken and discussed by participants reflected the centrality of religion in daily life; the connection with and appreciation of the natural world; frequent feelings of loneliness and isolation; and, the stress of meeting academic and familial expectations.  Implications for nursing point to the need for providing culturally sensitive health services, for facilitating adaptation to the new environment and fostering ties to home.en_GB
dc.subjectPhotovoiceen_GB
dc.subjectHealthen_GB
dc.subjectInternational Studentsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:20:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:20:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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