3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202294
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life Outcomes of Military Burn Patients
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: There is limited research examining quality of life (QOL) among burn survivors during post-hospitalization rehabilitation. The Roy Adaptation Model guided the research. Methods: A prospective, repeated measures design examined QOL in 77 burn survivors from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. A paired t-test compared data from burn unit discharge (DC) and 3 months post-DC. These data are part of a larger study following participants 18 months post-DC. Participants completed the Abbreviated Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS-A) and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Results: Most participants were men (76/99%), with a mean age of 25.5, who were Caucasian (53/69%), single (36/47%). and possessed a high school education (43/55%) or some college (28/36%). Most were in the Army (57/74%) and had been in the military for 3.5-5 years. A majority were victims of improvised implosive devices (53%); and the mean total body surface area burned was 24.24% (median=17.25%), with 14.5% full thickness burns. The average length of stay in the burn unit was 46 days. The paired t-test demonstrated that SWLS scores did not change from burn unit DC to 3 mo post-DC and that participants were satisfied with their lives overall. The BSHS total score was statistically significantly correlated with SWLS both at DC and 3 months (r=.41 at DC, p< .000/ r=.65 at 3 mo, p< .000). Also, the participants reported significantly improved QOL over 3 months on the total BSHS-A score (t=3.37, df=70, p< .001) and several domains or subscales of the BSHS-A.  Discussion & Implications for Nursing: Discharge from the burn unit marks the beginning of a lengthy adjustment process for service members with burn injuries. Improvements in perceived physical and role function occur during the first 3 months post burn unit discharge; however, burn patients should be followed longitudinally to better understand rehabilitation QOL.
Keywords:
Military Quality of Life Burns
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life Outcomes of Military Burn Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202294-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: There is limited research examining quality of life (QOL) among burn survivors during post-hospitalization rehabilitation. The Roy Adaptation Model guided the research. Methods: A prospective, repeated measures design examined QOL in 77 burn survivors from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. A paired t-test compared data from burn unit discharge (DC) and 3 months post-DC. These data are part of a larger study following participants 18 months post-DC. Participants completed the Abbreviated Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS-A) and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Results: Most participants were men (76/99%), with a mean age of 25.5, who were Caucasian (53/69%), single (36/47%). and possessed a high school education (43/55%) or some college (28/36%). Most were in the Army (57/74%) and had been in the military for 3.5-5 years. A majority were victims of improvised implosive devices (53%); and the mean total body surface area burned was 24.24% (median=17.25%), with 14.5% full thickness burns. The average length of stay in the burn unit was 46 days. The paired t-test demonstrated that SWLS scores did not change from burn unit DC to 3 mo post-DC and that participants were satisfied with their lives overall. The BSHS total score was statistically significantly correlated with SWLS both at DC and 3 months (r=.41 at DC, p< .000/ r=.65 at 3 mo, p< .000). Also, the participants reported significantly improved QOL over 3 months on the total BSHS-A score (t=3.37, df=70, p< .001) and several domains or subscales of the BSHS-A.  Discussion & Implications for Nursing: Discharge from the burn unit marks the beginning of a lengthy adjustment process for service members with burn injuries. Improvements in perceived physical and role function occur during the first 3 months post burn unit discharge; however, burn patients should be followed longitudinally to better understand rehabilitation QOL.en_GB
dc.subjectMilitary Quality of Life Burnsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:20:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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