An Educational Intervention in Pediatric Resuscitation for Nurses Working in Ghana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202308
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Educational Intervention in Pediatric Resuscitation for Nurses Working in Ghana
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this Study was to determine if a one-day World Health Emergency Triage and Treatment Program, taught from a self-efficacy perspective, would increase Ghanaian nurses’ knowledge, skill, and self-efficacy in pediatric resuscitation. Theoretical Framework: The assumption of the Theory of Self-efficacy is that self-efficacy, an individual’s internalized belief of his/her capability to perform a behavior, is a necessary precondition for the successful implementation of resuscitative behaviors in emergency settings. Methods: A one group, pretest, posttest design was used to evaluate the differences in perceived self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills of pediatric resuscitation after a one-day intensive, educational intervention. A convenience sample of 41 nurses working in a public, teaching hospital in Ghana participated in the study. The Self-Efficacy in Pediatric Resuscitation in General Questionnaire - Revised, and the Self-Efficacy in Bag and Mask Ventilation Questionnaire – Revised, were used to measure the differences in the individual’s perceived self-efficacy relative to the specific tasks.   The Psychomotor Skills Test, and Emergency Treatment and Triage Knowledge Test were used to assess the differences in psychomotor skills and knowledge respectively. Paired samples t-tests were used to measure differences between the pre and post tests. Results: Forty one nurses from Ghana participated in the study. Paired samples t-tests revealed a statistically significant increase in self-efficacy for pediatric resuscitation in general (p < .001), self-efficacy in bag and mask ventilation (p < .001), knowledge, (p < .001), management of the choking infant (p < .001) and management of the choking child (p < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Findings from this study suggest a modified, one-day World Health Emergency Triage  and Treatment Program may increase self-efficacy, knowledge and skills in pediatric resuscitation for Ghanaian nurses. Pediatric resuscitation education constitutes a low cost intervention with a potential to reduce pediatric mortality in the developing world.
Keywords:
self-efficacy; child mortality; pediatric resuscitation
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Educational Intervention in Pediatric Resuscitation for Nurses Working in Ghanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202308-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this Study was to determine if a one-day World Health Emergency Triage and Treatment Program, taught from a self-efficacy perspective, would increase Ghanaian nurses’ knowledge, skill, and self-efficacy in pediatric resuscitation. Theoretical Framework: The assumption of the Theory of Self-efficacy is that self-efficacy, an individual’s internalized belief of his/her capability to perform a behavior, is a necessary precondition for the successful implementation of resuscitative behaviors in emergency settings. Methods: A one group, pretest, posttest design was used to evaluate the differences in perceived self-efficacy, knowledge, and skills of pediatric resuscitation after a one-day intensive, educational intervention. A convenience sample of 41 nurses working in a public, teaching hospital in Ghana participated in the study. The Self-Efficacy in Pediatric Resuscitation in General Questionnaire - Revised, and the Self-Efficacy in Bag and Mask Ventilation Questionnaire – Revised, were used to measure the differences in the individual’s perceived self-efficacy relative to the specific tasks.   The Psychomotor Skills Test, and Emergency Treatment and Triage Knowledge Test were used to assess the differences in psychomotor skills and knowledge respectively. Paired samples t-tests were used to measure differences between the pre and post tests. Results: Forty one nurses from Ghana participated in the study. Paired samples t-tests revealed a statistically significant increase in self-efficacy for pediatric resuscitation in general (p < .001), self-efficacy in bag and mask ventilation (p < .001), knowledge, (p < .001), management of the choking infant (p < .001) and management of the choking child (p < .001). Conclusions and Implications: Findings from this study suggest a modified, one-day World Health Emergency Triage  and Treatment Program may increase self-efficacy, knowledge and skills in pediatric resuscitation for Ghanaian nurses. Pediatric resuscitation education constitutes a low cost intervention with a potential to reduce pediatric mortality in the developing world.en_GB
dc.subjectself-efficacyen_GB
dc.subjectchild mortalityen_GB
dc.subjectpediatric resuscitationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:21:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:21:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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