Effect of Pre/Post Discharge Interventions on Breastfeeding Outcomes and Weight Gain Among Premature Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202317
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Pre/Post Discharge Interventions on Breastfeeding Outcomes and Weight Gain Among Premature Infants
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: This systematic review was conducted to investigate the effect of pre/post discharge interventions on breastfeeding outcomes and weight gain among preterm infants. Data Sources: PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database were searched for study selection using MeSH terms “infant/premature, breastfeeding, weight gain, patient discharge, postnatal care, and counseling”. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria included studies which involved preterm infants who were born ? 37 weeks of gestation, randomized controlled trials that were in English, conducted in developed countries, and had breastfeeding and weight gain outcomes.  A total of eight articles met study inclusion criteria. Data extraction: All data related to breastfeeding outcomes including duration, exclusivity, maternal satisfaction and weight gain were extracted from the randomized clinical trials for the purpose of data synthesis. Data Synthesis: A total of 310 studies were reviewed. Eight randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria with gestational age ranged from 23 to 37 weeks. The evidence recommended kangaroo care, peer counseling, in-home breast milk intake measurement, and post-discharge lactation support for improving breastfeeding outcomes among preterm infants. In addition, findings found improved maternal satisfaction with post-discharge interventions. No significant evidence of pre/post discharge interventions on weight gain was found. Conclusions: Pre and post discharge interventions were effective in promoting breastfeeding outcomes and maternal satisfaction among mothers of preterm infants. These findings have important clinical implications that support the need for evidence-based breastfeeding interventions for preterm infants before discharge and vigilant post-discharge support. Research to determine more effective interventions to promote exclusive and long-term breastfeeding among preterm infants is required.
Keywords:
breastfeeding outcomes; pre/post discharge interventions; Premature infant
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Pre/Post Discharge Interventions on Breastfeeding Outcomes and Weight Gain Among Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202317-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: This systematic review was conducted to investigate the effect of pre/post discharge interventions on breastfeeding outcomes and weight gain among preterm infants. Data Sources: PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database were searched for study selection using MeSH terms “infant/premature, breastfeeding, weight gain, patient discharge, postnatal care, and counseling”. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria included studies which involved preterm infants who were born ? 37 weeks of gestation, randomized controlled trials that were in English, conducted in developed countries, and had breastfeeding and weight gain outcomes.  A total of eight articles met study inclusion criteria. Data extraction: All data related to breastfeeding outcomes including duration, exclusivity, maternal satisfaction and weight gain were extracted from the randomized clinical trials for the purpose of data synthesis. Data Synthesis: A total of 310 studies were reviewed. Eight randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria with gestational age ranged from 23 to 37 weeks. The evidence recommended kangaroo care, peer counseling, in-home breast milk intake measurement, and post-discharge lactation support for improving breastfeeding outcomes among preterm infants. In addition, findings found improved maternal satisfaction with post-discharge interventions. No significant evidence of pre/post discharge interventions on weight gain was found. Conclusions: Pre and post discharge interventions were effective in promoting breastfeeding outcomes and maternal satisfaction among mothers of preterm infants. These findings have important clinical implications that support the need for evidence-based breastfeeding interventions for preterm infants before discharge and vigilant post-discharge support. Research to determine more effective interventions to promote exclusive and long-term breastfeeding among preterm infants is required.en_GB
dc.subjectbreastfeeding outcomesen_GB
dc.subjectpre/post discharge interventionsen_GB
dc.subjectPremature infanten_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:21:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:21:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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