Improving Patient Satisfaction with Pain Management Utilizing Six Sigma Methodology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202319
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Patient Satisfaction with Pain Management Utilizing Six Sigma Methodology
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose Our goal as a Health System is >90th percentile in key publicly reported indicators. Patient satisfaction with pain management indicated a downward trend compared to fiscal year 2009. Significance Our project purpose is to increase patient satisfaction related to pain management to at or above the 90th percentile (QDM) and to 67.0 (RBC) in Q3 (April/May/June) FY 2010. Literature supports decreased patient satisfaction related to pain management affects complaints, compliance, and safety. Financial impact is difficult to assign, the cost of poor quality could be the customer choosing a different facility, increased length of stay and/or complications. Description Using Six Sigma methodology and review of evidence, a multidisciplinary team formed to review current status. The intervention accepted for pilot was pharmacist bedside consultation with patients. Pharmacist education moved forward. Patients were identified during daily progression meetings.  Triggers for pharmacy consults included PCA utilization > 48 hours, frequent PRN medication administration, pain uncontrolled by current regimen and RN/MD request.  Outcomes Consults began May 14th, 2010. To date, 20 patients have received pharmacist consultation. 15 had recommendations accepted by the physician, 1 partially, 1 not accepted, 3 n/a. Mean pain score prior to consultation 4.329, after consultation was 2.84. Quality data improved in QDM and RBC categories. Conclusions Pain management consults appear to have a positive impact on average pain scores. Verbal feedback by patients has been positive. Limitations to this service include pharmacy hours, staffing levels, patient acuity, hospital census, patient recognition, and tasks. Implications Research supports that pain intensity is only one factor to be considered, other factors are: patient expectation, patient education and quality of interaction with health care providers. IRB approval is underway to survey patients/families assessing these factors.
Keywords:
Six Sigma; patient satisfaction; pain management
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Patient Satisfaction with Pain Management Utilizing Six Sigma Methodologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202319-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose Our goal as a Health System is >90th percentile in key publicly reported indicators. Patient satisfaction with pain management indicated a downward trend compared to fiscal year 2009. Significance Our project purpose is to increase patient satisfaction related to pain management to at or above the 90th percentile (QDM) and to 67.0 (RBC) in Q3 (April/May/June) FY 2010. Literature supports decreased patient satisfaction related to pain management affects complaints, compliance, and safety. Financial impact is difficult to assign, the cost of poor quality could be the customer choosing a different facility, increased length of stay and/or complications. Description Using Six Sigma methodology and review of evidence, a multidisciplinary team formed to review current status. The intervention accepted for pilot was pharmacist bedside consultation with patients. Pharmacist education moved forward. Patients were identified during daily progression meetings.  Triggers for pharmacy consults included PCA utilization > 48 hours, frequent PRN medication administration, pain uncontrolled by current regimen and RN/MD request.  Outcomes Consults began May 14th, 2010. To date, 20 patients have received pharmacist consultation. 15 had recommendations accepted by the physician, 1 partially, 1 not accepted, 3 n/a. Mean pain score prior to consultation 4.329, after consultation was 2.84. Quality data improved in QDM and RBC categories. Conclusions Pain management consults appear to have a positive impact on average pain scores. Verbal feedback by patients has been positive. Limitations to this service include pharmacy hours, staffing levels, patient acuity, hospital census, patient recognition, and tasks. Implications Research supports that pain intensity is only one factor to be considered, other factors are: patient expectation, patient education and quality of interaction with health care providers. IRB approval is underway to survey patients/families assessing these factors.en_GB
dc.subjectSix Sigmaen_GB
dc.subjectpatient satisfactionen_GB
dc.subjectpain managementen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:22:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:22:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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