2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203129
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Basic Skills for Knowledge Translation: An Introductory Course
Abstract:
(Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference Posters, Top Three Winners) Background: Scientific research has made countless medical discoveries to improve patient outcomes, yet our healthcare system often fails to incorporate these breakthroughs into clinical practice. On average, patients in the U.S. receive half of the therapies they should1. Knowledge translation (KT) is the science dedicated to closing the knowledge to practice gap and translating biomedical and clinical research to practice 2. Work in this area requires knowledge of effective therapies and research methods, and identifies strategies and interventions to ensure patients receive them. KT is increasingly viewed by stakeholders as a valuable vehicle for improving health care and public health. However, the growth of KT as a discipline has lagged behind this growing awareness. In part, this is because the demand is outpacing the number of new scientists entering the field of KT, and the multidisciplinary nature of KT. In light of this unmet need, and as part of CTSA-related activities, we developed and convened a 2-day course to introduce the basic principles of KT, focusing on efforts aimed at increasing the extent to which patients receive evidence-based therapies. Level of Education Program: Healthcare providers, masters or doctoral prepared students. Targeted Learning Outcomes: Students will: appreciate the unique perspective and importance of KT for a variety of stakeholders; discuss and compare two frameworks for KT; recall and discuss the use of practical tools to improve KT; and demonstrate understanding of the concepts and tools for KT through application to a case study and plan for improving KT using this case study. Teaching-Learning Activities: Day 1 included didactic presentations and instructor-facilitated discussions of the concepts, methods, and application of KT theory and practice. On Day 2, students worked in small groups to apply the concepts learned in Day 1 to a practical case study and implementation plan for a KT problem. Evaluation of Approach: The course content and methods were evaluated in a masked fashion by students following course completion.
Keywords:
Basic; Translation
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Basic Skills for Knowledge Translation: An Introductory Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203129-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference Posters, Top Three Winners) Background: Scientific research has made countless medical discoveries to improve patient outcomes, yet our healthcare system often fails to incorporate these breakthroughs into clinical practice. On average, patients in the U.S. receive half of the therapies they should1. Knowledge translation (KT) is the science dedicated to closing the knowledge to practice gap and translating biomedical and clinical research to practice 2. Work in this area requires knowledge of effective therapies and research methods, and identifies strategies and interventions to ensure patients receive them. KT is increasingly viewed by stakeholders as a valuable vehicle for improving health care and public health. However, the growth of KT as a discipline has lagged behind this growing awareness. In part, this is because the demand is outpacing the number of new scientists entering the field of KT, and the multidisciplinary nature of KT. In light of this unmet need, and as part of CTSA-related activities, we developed and convened a 2-day course to introduce the basic principles of KT, focusing on efforts aimed at increasing the extent to which patients receive evidence-based therapies. Level of Education Program: Healthcare providers, masters or doctoral prepared students. Targeted Learning Outcomes: Students will: appreciate the unique perspective and importance of KT for a variety of stakeholders; discuss and compare two frameworks for KT; recall and discuss the use of practical tools to improve KT; and demonstrate understanding of the concepts and tools for KT through application to a case study and plan for improving KT using this case study. Teaching-Learning Activities: Day 1 included didactic presentations and instructor-facilitated discussions of the concepts, methods, and application of KT theory and practice. On Day 2, students worked in small groups to apply the concepts learned in Day 1 to a practical case study and implementation plan for a KT problem. Evaluation of Approach: The course content and methods were evaluated in a masked fashion by students following course completion.en_GB
dc.subjectBasicen_GB
dc.subjectTranslationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T10:54:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T10:54:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conferenceen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.