2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203130
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interprofessional Quality and Safety Education Through Simulation
Abstract:
(Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference Posters, Top Three Winners) Background: Quality and safety competencies for health professions students have been identified by multiple professional groups and accrediting bodies. Attainment of these competencies requires knowledge and execution of specific skills. High-fidelity simulation provides students the opportunity to practice clinical skills and quality and safety competencies in a safe, non-threatening environment. Interprofessional simulation scenarios can be constructed that require nursing and physical therapy students to use clinical and teamwork skills to achieve patient-centered care goals and prevent adverse events. Level of Educational Program: Undergraduate nursing students, doctor of physical therapy students (DPT). Targeted Learning Outcomes: Identify the knowledge and skills needed to function as an effective member of an interprofessional team; Plan and effectively implement patient care strategies as a member of an interprofessional team during simulation; Demonstrate effective interprofessional teamwork and communication skills during simulation. Teaching-Learning Activities: 29 undergraduate nursing students and 41 DPT students received education regarding teamwork and communication using AHRQ’s TeamSTEPPSTM team training curriculum. Content was delivered in either the classroom setting (DPT) or via on-line modules (nursing). The high-fidelity simulation experience required DPT students to mobilize a patient with a traumatic brain injury while nursing students assessed skin and vital signs and monitored lines and tubes. The simulated patient was at risk for aspiration due to tube feeding, skin breakdown due to immobilization and incorrect application of an orthosis, and unstable vital signs due to poor tolerance for postural changes. The simulation experience lasted 20 minutes followed by a 40-minute interprofessional debriefing. Evaluation Approach: We conducted a pre- and post-simulation assessment of student attitudes toward interdisciplinary education using the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale, which consists of three subscales: Competency and Autonomy; Perceived Need for Cooperation; and Perception of Actual Cooperation. DPT students’ post-simulation perceptions were significantly greater than their pre-simulation perceptions for all three sub-scales. Nursing students’ post-simulation perceptions were significantly greater than their pre-simulation perceptions for one sub-scale—Perceptions of Actual Cooperation. Bibliography: 1.Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). (2010). TeamSTEPPS: Strategies and tools to enhance performance and patient safety. Retrieved July 12, 2010, from http://teamstepps.ahrq.gov/ 2.Bainbridge L, NasmithL, Orchard C, & Wood V. (2010). Competencies for interprofessional collaboration. Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 24(1), 6-11. 3.Baker, C. et al (2008). Simulation in interprofessional education for patient-centered collaborative care, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 64(4), 372-379. 4.Blackstock, F. C., & Jull, G. A. (2007). High-fidelity patient simulation in physiotherapy education. The Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 53(1), 3-5. 5.Cronenwett, L. et al (2007). Quality and safety education for nurses. Nursing Outlook, 55, 122-131. 6.Cronenwett, L. et al (2009). Quality and safety education for advanced nursing practice. Nursing Outlook, 57(6), 338-348. 7.Gaba, D. M. (2004). The future vision of simulation in health care. Quality & Safety in Health Care, 13 Suppl 1, i2-10. 8.Jeffries, P.R. (2005). A framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating simulations used as teaching strategies in nursing. Nursing and Education Perspectives, 26(2), 96-103. 9.Kigin, C. (2009). A systems view of physical therapy care: shifting to a new paradigm for the profession. Physical Therapy, 89, 1117-1119. 10.Luecht, R. M., Madsen, M. K., Taugher, M. P., Petterson, B. J. (1990). Assessing professional perceptions: design and validation of an interdisciplinary education perception scale. Journal of Allied Health, 181-191. 11.McFadyen, A.K., Maclaren, W.M., & Webster, V.S. (2007). The interdisciplinary education perception scale (IEPS): An alternative remodeled sub-scale structure and its reliability. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 21(4), 433-443. 12.McNair, R. P. (2005). The case for educating health care students in professionalism as the core content of interprofessional education. Medical Education, 39, 456-464. 13.Rosen, M. A., Salas, E., Wilson, K. A., King, H. B., Salisbury, M., Augenstein, J. S., et al. (2008). Measuring team performance in simulation-based training: adopting best practices for healthcare. Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, 3(1), 33-41. 14.Rosen, M.A., Salas, E., Silvestri, S., Wu, T., & Lazzara, E.(2008). A measurement tool for simulation-based training in emergency medicine: the simulation module for assessment of resident targeted event responses (SMARTER) approach. Simulation in Healthcare, 3(3), 170-179. 15.Rosen, M. A., Salas, E., Wu, T. S., Silvestri, S., Lazzara, E. H., Lyons, R., et al. (2008). Promoting teamwork: an event-based approach to simulation-based teamwork training for emergency medicine residents. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 15(11), 1190-1198. 16.Salas, E., DiazGranados, D., Weaver, S. J., King, H. (2008). Does team training work? Principles for health care. Academic Emergency Medicine, 15, 1-8. 17.Salas, E. (2005). Is there a big five in teamwork. Small Group Research, 36(5), 555. 18.Salas, E., Wilson, K. A., Burke, C. S., & Priest, H. A. (2005). Using simulation-based training to improve patient safety: What does it take? Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety / Joint Commission Resources, 31(7), 363-371. 19.Solomon, P. (2010). Interprofessional education: has its time come? Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 24(1),3. 20.Thompson, S.A. & Tilden, V.P. (2009). Embracing quality and safety education for the 21st century: Building interprofessional education. Journal of Nursing Education, 48(12), 698-701. 21.Tomkowiak, J. (2010). Culture eats strategy for lunch. Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 24(1),4. 22.Wolff-Burke, M. (2005). Clinical instructors’ descriptions of physical therapist student professional behaviors. Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 19 (1), 67-76. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Summer Institute, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Education; Simulation
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterprofessional Quality and Safety Education Through Simulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203130-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference Posters, Top Three Winners) Background: Quality and safety competencies for health professions students have been identified by multiple professional groups and accrediting bodies. Attainment of these competencies requires knowledge and execution of specific skills. High-fidelity simulation provides students the opportunity to practice clinical skills and quality and safety competencies in a safe, non-threatening environment. Interprofessional simulation scenarios can be constructed that require nursing and physical therapy students to use clinical and teamwork skills to achieve patient-centered care goals and prevent adverse events. Level of Educational Program: Undergraduate nursing students, doctor of physical therapy students (DPT). Targeted Learning Outcomes: Identify the knowledge and skills needed to function as an effective member of an interprofessional team; Plan and effectively implement patient care strategies as a member of an interprofessional team during simulation; Demonstrate effective interprofessional teamwork and communication skills during simulation. Teaching-Learning Activities: 29 undergraduate nursing students and 41 DPT students received education regarding teamwork and communication using AHRQ’s TeamSTEPPSTM team training curriculum. Content was delivered in either the classroom setting (DPT) or via on-line modules (nursing). The high-fidelity simulation experience required DPT students to mobilize a patient with a traumatic brain injury while nursing students assessed skin and vital signs and monitored lines and tubes. The simulated patient was at risk for aspiration due to tube feeding, skin breakdown due to immobilization and incorrect application of an orthosis, and unstable vital signs due to poor tolerance for postural changes. The simulation experience lasted 20 minutes followed by a 40-minute interprofessional debriefing. Evaluation Approach: We conducted a pre- and post-simulation assessment of student attitudes toward interdisciplinary education using the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale, which consists of three subscales: Competency and Autonomy; Perceived Need for Cooperation; and Perception of Actual Cooperation. DPT students’ post-simulation perceptions were significantly greater than their pre-simulation perceptions for all three sub-scales. Nursing students’ post-simulation perceptions were significantly greater than their pre-simulation perceptions for one sub-scale—Perceptions of Actual Cooperation. Bibliography: 1.Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). (2010). TeamSTEPPS: Strategies and tools to enhance performance and patient safety. Retrieved July 12, 2010, from http://teamstepps.ahrq.gov/ 2.Bainbridge L, NasmithL, Orchard C, & Wood V. (2010). Competencies for interprofessional collaboration. Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 24(1), 6-11. 3.Baker, C. et al (2008). Simulation in interprofessional education for patient-centered collaborative care, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 64(4), 372-379. 4.Blackstock, F. C., & Jull, G. A. (2007). High-fidelity patient simulation in physiotherapy education. The Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 53(1), 3-5. 5.Cronenwett, L. et al (2007). Quality and safety education for nurses. Nursing Outlook, 55, 122-131. 6.Cronenwett, L. et al (2009). Quality and safety education for advanced nursing practice. Nursing Outlook, 57(6), 338-348. 7.Gaba, D. M. (2004). The future vision of simulation in health care. Quality & Safety in Health Care, 13 Suppl 1, i2-10. 8.Jeffries, P.R. (2005). A framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating simulations used as teaching strategies in nursing. Nursing and Education Perspectives, 26(2), 96-103. 9.Kigin, C. (2009). A systems view of physical therapy care: shifting to a new paradigm for the profession. Physical Therapy, 89, 1117-1119. 10.Luecht, R. M., Madsen, M. K., Taugher, M. P., Petterson, B. J. (1990). Assessing professional perceptions: design and validation of an interdisciplinary education perception scale. Journal of Allied Health, 181-191. 11.McFadyen, A.K., Maclaren, W.M., & Webster, V.S. (2007). The interdisciplinary education perception scale (IEPS): An alternative remodeled sub-scale structure and its reliability. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 21(4), 433-443. 12.McNair, R. P. (2005). The case for educating health care students in professionalism as the core content of interprofessional education. Medical Education, 39, 456-464. 13.Rosen, M. A., Salas, E., Wilson, K. A., King, H. B., Salisbury, M., Augenstein, J. S., et al. (2008). Measuring team performance in simulation-based training: adopting best practices for healthcare. Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, 3(1), 33-41. 14.Rosen, M.A., Salas, E., Silvestri, S., Wu, T., & Lazzara, E.(2008). A measurement tool for simulation-based training in emergency medicine: the simulation module for assessment of resident targeted event responses (SMARTER) approach. Simulation in Healthcare, 3(3), 170-179. 15.Rosen, M. A., Salas, E., Wu, T. S., Silvestri, S., Lazzara, E. H., Lyons, R., et al. (2008). Promoting teamwork: an event-based approach to simulation-based teamwork training for emergency medicine residents. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 15(11), 1190-1198. 16.Salas, E., DiazGranados, D., Weaver, S. J., King, H. (2008). Does team training work? Principles for health care. Academic Emergency Medicine, 15, 1-8. 17.Salas, E. (2005). Is there a big five in teamwork. Small Group Research, 36(5), 555. 18.Salas, E., Wilson, K. A., Burke, C. S., & Priest, H. A. (2005). Using simulation-based training to improve patient safety: What does it take? Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety / Joint Commission Resources, 31(7), 363-371. 19.Solomon, P. (2010). Interprofessional education: has its time come? Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 24(1),3. 20.Thompson, S.A. & Tilden, V.P. (2009). Embracing quality and safety education for the 21st century: Building interprofessional education. Journal of Nursing Education, 48(12), 698-701. 21.Tomkowiak, J. (2010). Culture eats strategy for lunch. Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 24(1),4. 22.Wolff-Burke, M. (2005). Clinical instructors’ descriptions of physical therapist student professional behaviors. Journal of Physical Therapy Education, 19 (1), 67-76. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Summer Institute, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.subjectSimulationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T10:54:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T10:54:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conferenceen_GB
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