Integrating Evidence Based Practice into Patient Safety Manager Training DOD Patient Safety Solution Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203131
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating Evidence Based Practice into Patient Safety Manager Training DOD Patient Safety Solution Center
Abstract:
(Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference Posters, Top Three Winners) Background: As part of its mission to foster a culture of safety throughout the Military Health System (MHS), the Department of Defense Patient Safety Program (DoD PSP) is responsible for the professional development of the MHS patient safety workforce. In October 2009, the DoD PSP convened a team of training specialists and subject matter experts to design a three-day program for entry-level Patient Safety Managers (PSMs), incorporating the latest evidence-based safe practices, research, and instructional techniques. The course design team used the ADDIE (Analyze-Design-Develop-Implement-Evaluate) Model for curriculum development with a continuous process improvement approach. A key objective of the Basic PSM Course was to build PSM competence around integrating EBP into their professional activities. Level of Educational Program: The course targets competency development of PSMs with less than one year experience. Targeted Learning Outcomes: For EBP: Participants are able to access the latest EBPs, integrate EBPs into their PSM activities, and evaluate impact using basic measurement tools and techniques. Teaching-Learning Activities: Course pre-work: a Web search of evidence-based safe practices and the associated national healthcare quality and safety organizations. Interactive classroom lessons, led by subject matter experts, on various aspects of integrating EBP into PSM activities. Hands-on classroom activities, including development of individualized action plans or “roadmaps” for their next six months on the job. Follow-up coaching calls at 3, 6, and 12 months post-training for on-going performance support. Evaluation of Approach: Evaluation incorporates the sciences of the Context-Input-Process-Product Model and the Kirkpatrick Four-Level model for program and training evaluation. Each course undergoes a multi-level evaluation conducted at periodic intervals, including assessments of participant reactions to training, learning, learning transfer to the job, and organizational barriers and enablers to learning transfer. Results show highly positive reactions to training, increased perceived competence in targeted PSM competencies (mean % PSMs with high confidence: 21.5% before training, 92.8% at 6-months post-training), and achievement of planned PSM activities over time. Bibliography: Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). ACCME Guide to the Accreditation Process: Demonstrating the Implementation of the ACCME’s Updated Accreditation Criteria. Available at www.accme.org. Last accessed December 2009. ACCME. The ACCME’s essential areas and their elements. Available at www.accme.org. Last accessed December, 2009. ACCME. Overall program evaluation and improvement: one way to evaluate the effectiveness of a CME program. Available under “Popular Downloads – Updated Accreditation Criteria Toolkit” at www.accme.org. Last accessed December2009. American Institutes for Research. Assessing the impact of the patient safety improvement corps (PSIC) training program. Evaluation Plan. Final. Washington DC. 2008. Contract No. 233020082; Order No. HHSP2332007000 01T. Prepared for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. American Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM) of the American Hospital Association. The Growing Role of the Patient Safety Officer: Implications for Risk Managers. Chicago, IL: ASHRM; June 2004. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare (ACSQH). National Patient Safety Education Framework. Commonwealth of Australia: July, 2005. Bersin, J. (2005). The High Impact Learning Organization (2nd Ed.) Bersin & Associates. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for Patient Safety. Patient Safety Curriculum. Available at http://www.patientsafety.gov/curriculum/indes.html. Last accessed December 2009. Duke Medicine Patient Safety Center. Available at http://edservices.mc.duke.edu/PtSafety/Brochure_DM Patient Safety Center_May 2009.pdf. Last accessed December 2009. Goldstein IL, Ford JK. Training in organizations: Needs assessment, development, and evaluation. 4th ed. Belmont (CA): Wadsworth-Thomson Learning; 2002. Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education. The Patient Safety Imperative course, Available at http://cme.hms.harvard.edu/cmeups/pdf/00291307.pdf. Last accessed December 2009. Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). PSO Executive Development Program. Available at http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Programs/ProfessionalDevelopment/PatientSafetyProgramMarch2010.htm. Last accessed December 2009. Jones DL. Viability of the commitment-for-change evaluation strategy in continuing medical education. Acad Med. 1990 Sept;65(9 Supp):S37-38. Kirkpatrick DL, Kirkpatrick JD. Implementing the four levels: A practical guide for effective evaluation of training programs. 1st ed. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler; 2007. Lockyer JM, Fidler H, Ward R, Basson RJ, Elliot S, Toews J. Commitment to change statements: A way of understanding how participants use information and skills taught in an educational session. J Cont Educ Health Prof. 2001 Spring;21(2):82-89. National Quality Forum (NQF). Safe Practices for Better Healthcare - 2009 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: NQF; 2009. Nelson C. Evaluation of a patient safety training program. Technical Report. Santa Monica (CA): RAND Corp. 2005. Document No: TR-276-HLTH. Prepared for the Jewish Healthcare Foundation by RAND Health, a unit of the RAND Corporation. Overton GK, MacVicar R. Requesting a commitment to change: conditions that produce behavioral or attitudinal commitment. J Cont Educ Health Prof. 2008 Spring;28(2):60-66. Ratanawongsa N, Thomas PA, Marinopoulos SS, Dorman T, Wilson LM, Ashar BH … Qayyum R, Bass EB. The reported validity and reliability of methods for evaluating continuing medical education: a systematic review. Acad Med. 2008 March;83(3):274-283. Salas, E., Almeida, S. A., Salisbury, M., King, H., Lazzara, E. H., Lyons, R., et al. What are the critical success factors for team training in health care? Jt Comm J Qual & Pt Saf. 2009;35(8):398-405. Spivey BE. Continuing medical education in the United States: why it needs reform and how we propose to accomplish it. J Cont Educ Health Prof. 2005 Summer;25(3):134-143. The Joint Commission (JC) and Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Essential Guide for Patient Safety Officers. Chicago, IL: JC; January, 2009. World Health Organization (WHO). WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO Press, 2009. Available at http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2009/9789241598316_eng.pdf. Last accessed December 2009. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Summer Institute, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Evidence-Based Practice; Safety
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegrating Evidence Based Practice into Patient Safety Manager Training DOD Patient Safety Solution Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203131-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conference Posters, Top Three Winners) Background: As part of its mission to foster a culture of safety throughout the Military Health System (MHS), the Department of Defense Patient Safety Program (DoD PSP) is responsible for the professional development of the MHS patient safety workforce. In October 2009, the DoD PSP convened a team of training specialists and subject matter experts to design a three-day program for entry-level Patient Safety Managers (PSMs), incorporating the latest evidence-based safe practices, research, and instructional techniques. The course design team used the ADDIE (Analyze-Design-Develop-Implement-Evaluate) Model for curriculum development with a continuous process improvement approach. A key objective of the Basic PSM Course was to build PSM competence around integrating EBP into their professional activities. Level of Educational Program: The course targets competency development of PSMs with less than one year experience. Targeted Learning Outcomes: For EBP: Participants are able to access the latest EBPs, integrate EBPs into their PSM activities, and evaluate impact using basic measurement tools and techniques. Teaching-Learning Activities: Course pre-work: a Web search of evidence-based safe practices and the associated national healthcare quality and safety organizations. Interactive classroom lessons, led by subject matter experts, on various aspects of integrating EBP into PSM activities. Hands-on classroom activities, including development of individualized action plans or “roadmaps” for their next six months on the job. Follow-up coaching calls at 3, 6, and 12 months post-training for on-going performance support. Evaluation of Approach: Evaluation incorporates the sciences of the Context-Input-Process-Product Model and the Kirkpatrick Four-Level model for program and training evaluation. Each course undergoes a multi-level evaluation conducted at periodic intervals, including assessments of participant reactions to training, learning, learning transfer to the job, and organizational barriers and enablers to learning transfer. Results show highly positive reactions to training, increased perceived competence in targeted PSM competencies (mean % PSMs with high confidence: 21.5% before training, 92.8% at 6-months post-training), and achievement of planned PSM activities over time. Bibliography: Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). ACCME Guide to the Accreditation Process: Demonstrating the Implementation of the ACCME’s Updated Accreditation Criteria. Available at www.accme.org. Last accessed December 2009. ACCME. The ACCME’s essential areas and their elements. Available at www.accme.org. Last accessed December, 2009. ACCME. Overall program evaluation and improvement: one way to evaluate the effectiveness of a CME program. Available under “Popular Downloads – Updated Accreditation Criteria Toolkit” at www.accme.org. Last accessed December2009. American Institutes for Research. Assessing the impact of the patient safety improvement corps (PSIC) training program. Evaluation Plan. Final. Washington DC. 2008. Contract No. 233020082; Order No. HHSP2332007000 01T. Prepared for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. American Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM) of the American Hospital Association. The Growing Role of the Patient Safety Officer: Implications for Risk Managers. Chicago, IL: ASHRM; June 2004. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare (ACSQH). National Patient Safety Education Framework. Commonwealth of Australia: July, 2005. Bersin, J. (2005). The High Impact Learning Organization (2nd Ed.) Bersin & Associates. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for Patient Safety. Patient Safety Curriculum. Available at http://www.patientsafety.gov/curriculum/indes.html. Last accessed December 2009. Duke Medicine Patient Safety Center. Available at http://edservices.mc.duke.edu/PtSafety/Brochure_DM Patient Safety Center_May 2009.pdf. Last accessed December 2009. Goldstein IL, Ford JK. Training in organizations: Needs assessment, development, and evaluation. 4th ed. Belmont (CA): Wadsworth-Thomson Learning; 2002. Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education. The Patient Safety Imperative course, Available at http://cme.hms.harvard.edu/cmeups/pdf/00291307.pdf. Last accessed December 2009. Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). PSO Executive Development Program. Available at http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Programs/ProfessionalDevelopment/PatientSafetyProgramMarch2010.htm. Last accessed December 2009. Jones DL. Viability of the commitment-for-change evaluation strategy in continuing medical education. Acad Med. 1990 Sept;65(9 Supp):S37-38. Kirkpatrick DL, Kirkpatrick JD. Implementing the four levels: A practical guide for effective evaluation of training programs. 1st ed. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler; 2007. Lockyer JM, Fidler H, Ward R, Basson RJ, Elliot S, Toews J. Commitment to change statements: A way of understanding how participants use information and skills taught in an educational session. J Cont Educ Health Prof. 2001 Spring;21(2):82-89. National Quality Forum (NQF). Safe Practices for Better Healthcare - 2009 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: NQF; 2009. Nelson C. Evaluation of a patient safety training program. Technical Report. Santa Monica (CA): RAND Corp. 2005. Document No: TR-276-HLTH. Prepared for the Jewish Healthcare Foundation by RAND Health, a unit of the RAND Corporation. Overton GK, MacVicar R. Requesting a commitment to change: conditions that produce behavioral or attitudinal commitment. J Cont Educ Health Prof. 2008 Spring;28(2):60-66. Ratanawongsa N, Thomas PA, Marinopoulos SS, Dorman T, Wilson LM, Ashar BH … Qayyum R, Bass EB. The reported validity and reliability of methods for evaluating continuing medical education: a systematic review. Acad Med. 2008 March;83(3):274-283. Salas, E., Almeida, S. A., Salisbury, M., King, H., Lazzara, E. H., Lyons, R., et al. What are the critical success factors for team training in health care? Jt Comm J Qual & Pt Saf. 2009;35(8):398-405. Spivey BE. Continuing medical education in the United States: why it needs reform and how we propose to accomplish it. J Cont Educ Health Prof. 2005 Summer;25(3):134-143. The Joint Commission (JC) and Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Essential Guide for Patient Safety Officers. Chicago, IL: JC; January, 2009. World Health Organization (WHO). WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide for Medical Schools. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO Press, 2009. Available at http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2009/9789241598316_eng.pdf. Last accessed December 2009. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Summer Institute, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectEvidence-Based Practiceen_GB
dc.subjectSafetyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T10:54:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T10:54:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Institute Educators’ Pre-Conferenceen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.