2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203132
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improved Communication in Anesthesia Patient Transfers of Care
Author(s):
Bready, Lois L.; Andrews, J. J.; Boatman, E.; Wong, E.; Davis, L.; Sulser, J.; Stevens, S.; Parekh, A.; Schafer, N.; Ingram, M.
Author Details:
Lois L. Bready, MD, email: bready@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
(Improvement Science Research Network) Introduction: An estimated 80 percent of serious medical errors involve miscommunication between caregivers when patients are transferred or handed-off, and TJC requires the use of a standardized approach to hand-off communications. Multiple checklists exist for transfers of care (TOC) in anesthesia practice. An ideal TOC process is succinct, driven by a written checklist, and may be modified for short vs. terminal TOC. At the time of this study, standard practice for anesthesia providers at our institution was a short verbal transfer of care from the outgoing to the incoming provider. Methods: A list of patient information elements was created from multiple handoff protocols, and was prioritized, stratified, and condensed by the Workgroup for the Development of Transfer of Care (TOC) Guidelines for Anesthesia Professionals of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Patient Safety Committee and by our process improvement team. Eighteen elements were identified as essential. Using this 18-element checklist , a process improvement study was conducted over a four-month period. Baseline: Providers (anesthesiology CA-1-3 residents, CRNAs) gave their customary verbal TOCs based on their idea of what was essential patient information. Observers documented number of essential data elements transmitted, using the checklist as an audit tool. Intervention: An education intervention was made to introduce the written checklist of to guide TOCs and rationale for its use. TOCs were observed after checklist implementation. The IRB considered this process improvement project to be exempt. Results: Baseline communication of essential elements was 50%. After intervention (educational and checklist), the rate of communication of essential elements increased to 93%. Conclusions: Implementation of a written checklist to guide TOC resulted in a near doubling of communication of essential information elements between anesthesia providers. Bibliography: Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations: 2007 National Patient Safety Goals Hospital Version Manual Chapter, including Implementation Expectations. Volpp K.G., Grande D.: Residents’ suggestions for reducing errors in teaching hospitals. N Engl J Med 348:851-855, Feb 27, 2003. Cook R.I., Render M., Woods D.D.: Gaps in the continuity of care and progress on patient safety. BMJ 320:791-794, Mar 18 2000. Arora V., et al.: Communication failures in patient signout and suggestions for improvement: a critical incident analysis. Qual Saf Health Care 2005 Dec14:401-407. O'Byrne WT 3rd, Weavind L, Selby J. The science and economics of improving clinical communication. Anesthesiol Clin. 2008 Dec;26(4):729-44, vii. Manser T, Foster S, Gisin S, Jaeckel D, Ummenhofer W. Assessing the quality of patient handoffs at care transitions. Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Dec;19(6):e44. [© Improvement Science Research Network, 2011. http://www.improvementscienceresearch.net/.]
Keywords:
Communication; Anesthesia
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Conference Date:
2011
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Improvement Science Research Network
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproved Communication in Anesthesia Patient Transfers of Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBready, Lois L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, J. J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoatman, E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWong, E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavis, L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSulser, J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorStevens, S.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorParekh, A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchafer, N.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIngram, M.en_GB
dc.author.detailsLois L. Bready, MD, email: bready@uthscsa.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203132-
dc.description.abstract(Improvement Science Research Network) Introduction: An estimated 80 percent of serious medical errors involve miscommunication between caregivers when patients are transferred or handed-off, and TJC requires the use of a standardized approach to hand-off communications. Multiple checklists exist for transfers of care (TOC) in anesthesia practice. An ideal TOC process is succinct, driven by a written checklist, and may be modified for short vs. terminal TOC. At the time of this study, standard practice for anesthesia providers at our institution was a short verbal transfer of care from the outgoing to the incoming provider. Methods: A list of patient information elements was created from multiple handoff protocols, and was prioritized, stratified, and condensed by the Workgroup for the Development of Transfer of Care (TOC) Guidelines for Anesthesia Professionals of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Patient Safety Committee and by our process improvement team. Eighteen elements were identified as essential. Using this 18-element checklist , a process improvement study was conducted over a four-month period. Baseline: Providers (anesthesiology CA-1-3 residents, CRNAs) gave their customary verbal TOCs based on their idea of what was essential patient information. Observers documented number of essential data elements transmitted, using the checklist as an audit tool. Intervention: An education intervention was made to introduce the written checklist of to guide TOCs and rationale for its use. TOCs were observed after checklist implementation. The IRB considered this process improvement project to be exempt. Results: Baseline communication of essential elements was 50%. After intervention (educational and checklist), the rate of communication of essential elements increased to 93%. Conclusions: Implementation of a written checklist to guide TOC resulted in a near doubling of communication of essential information elements between anesthesia providers. Bibliography: Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations: 2007 National Patient Safety Goals Hospital Version Manual Chapter, including Implementation Expectations. Volpp K.G., Grande D.: Residents’ suggestions for reducing errors in teaching hospitals. N Engl J Med 348:851-855, Feb 27, 2003. Cook R.I., Render M., Woods D.D.: Gaps in the continuity of care and progress on patient safety. BMJ 320:791-794, Mar 18 2000. Arora V., et al.: Communication failures in patient signout and suggestions for improvement: a critical incident analysis. Qual Saf Health Care 2005 Dec14:401-407. O'Byrne WT 3rd, Weavind L, Selby J. The science and economics of improving clinical communication. Anesthesiol Clin. 2008 Dec;26(4):729-44, vii. Manser T, Foster S, Gisin S, Jaeckel D, Ummenhofer W. Assessing the quality of patient handoffs at care transitions. Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Dec;19(6):e44. [© Improvement Science Research Network, 2011. http://www.improvementscienceresearch.net/.]en_GB
dc.subjectCommunicationen_GB
dc.subjectAnesthesiaen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T10:56:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T10:56:39Z-
dc.conference.date2011en
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Improvement Science Research Networken_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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