2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203148
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilization of a System-Wide Toolkit to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and To Create an Expert Team
Abstract:
(Improvement Science Research Network) Background: In October 2008, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS), launched a new Medicare payment provision through which 11 hospital-acquired conditions may result in decreased reimbursement if not coded as “Present on Admission”(POA). Purpose: Our pressure ulcer taskforce was charged with developing a toolkit and resources that standardized our practices, guidelines, and policies based on evidence based practice. Materials and Methods: The National Data base of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) was implemented as the basic competency for all nursing staff at hire and annually. Standardized formulary, protocols and guidelines for assessment and treatment were developed and placed on all nursing units. The toolkit was developed and placed on our intranet site as a resource and adjunct to our policy on pressure ulcers. Every hospital created a team of RN and PCA/NA skin care expert’s. Data collection tools, a webcast and internal reporting were formalized by our professional practice group with collaboration with our experts at quality. Best practices on skin care documentation, staging and care were videotaped and added to our skin care portal for staff to access and utilize for contact hours if desired. Results: Expert skin care teams were created in each site. Rounding with the team and observing the staff perform skin care demonstrated the hardwiring of the program. The Wound, ostomy and continence nurses (WOCN’s) facilitated training at the sites that do not have certified skin care specialists. As of December 2010, Pressure ulcer index is slightly above our target goal. Conclusions: Research suggests that the focus on pressure ulcer prevention must be hospital- wide and focused on all patient care providers. The hiring of additional WOCN's will ensure the development of expert high performing teams and improved outcomes. Bibliography: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2008). CMS proposes additions to Hospital-acquired conditions for fiscal year 2009. Retrieved from www.cms.hhs.gov/apps/media/press/factsheet.asp?Conuter=3042. Clancy, CM. and Tornberg, DN. (2007). TeamSTEPPS: assuring optimal teamwork In clinical settings. American Journal Medical Quality. 22(3); 214-217. Cuddigan, J., Ayello, E. A., Sussman, C., & Baronoski, S. eds. (2001). Pressure Ulcers in America: Prevalence, Incidence, and Implications for the Future. Reston, VA: National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. . Gibbons, W, Shanks, H., Kleinhelter, P, Jones, P. (2006). Eliminating Facility-Acquired Pressure Ulcers at Ascension Health. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. Hart, S.,Berquist, S., Gajewski, B., & Dunton, N. (2006). Reliability testing of the National database of nursing quality indicators-pressure ulcer indicators. Journal Of Nursing Care Quality. 21(3),256-265. Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Prevent Pressure Ulcers. Retrieved From: http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Programs/campaign/PressureUlcers.htm. Paris, C, Salas, E. and Cannon-Bowers, J. (2000). Teamwork in multi-person systems: A review and Analysis. Ergonomics, 23 (8), 1052-1075. [© Improvement Science Research Network, 2011. http://www.improvementscienceresearch.net/.]
Keywords:
Toolkit; Ulcers
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Improvement Science Research Network

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilization of a System-Wide Toolkit to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and To Create an Expert Teamen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203148-
dc.description.abstract(Improvement Science Research Network) Background: In October 2008, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS), launched a new Medicare payment provision through which 11 hospital-acquired conditions may result in decreased reimbursement if not coded as “Present on Admission”(POA). Purpose: Our pressure ulcer taskforce was charged with developing a toolkit and resources that standardized our practices, guidelines, and policies based on evidence based practice. Materials and Methods: The National Data base of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) was implemented as the basic competency for all nursing staff at hire and annually. Standardized formulary, protocols and guidelines for assessment and treatment were developed and placed on all nursing units. The toolkit was developed and placed on our intranet site as a resource and adjunct to our policy on pressure ulcers. Every hospital created a team of RN and PCA/NA skin care expert’s. Data collection tools, a webcast and internal reporting were formalized by our professional practice group with collaboration with our experts at quality. Best practices on skin care documentation, staging and care were videotaped and added to our skin care portal for staff to access and utilize for contact hours if desired. Results: Expert skin care teams were created in each site. Rounding with the team and observing the staff perform skin care demonstrated the hardwiring of the program. The Wound, ostomy and continence nurses (WOCN’s) facilitated training at the sites that do not have certified skin care specialists. As of December 2010, Pressure ulcer index is slightly above our target goal. Conclusions: Research suggests that the focus on pressure ulcer prevention must be hospital- wide and focused on all patient care providers. The hiring of additional WOCN's will ensure the development of expert high performing teams and improved outcomes. Bibliography: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2008). CMS proposes additions to Hospital-acquired conditions for fiscal year 2009. Retrieved from www.cms.hhs.gov/apps/media/press/factsheet.asp?Conuter=3042. Clancy, CM. and Tornberg, DN. (2007). TeamSTEPPS: assuring optimal teamwork In clinical settings. American Journal Medical Quality. 22(3); 214-217. Cuddigan, J., Ayello, E. A., Sussman, C., & Baronoski, S. eds. (2001). Pressure Ulcers in America: Prevalence, Incidence, and Implications for the Future. Reston, VA: National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. . Gibbons, W, Shanks, H., Kleinhelter, P, Jones, P. (2006). Eliminating Facility-Acquired Pressure Ulcers at Ascension Health. The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. Hart, S.,Berquist, S., Gajewski, B., & Dunton, N. (2006). Reliability testing of the National database of nursing quality indicators-pressure ulcer indicators. Journal Of Nursing Care Quality. 21(3),256-265. Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Prevent Pressure Ulcers. Retrieved From: http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Programs/campaign/PressureUlcers.htm. Paris, C, Salas, E. and Cannon-Bowers, J. (2000). Teamwork in multi-person systems: A review and Analysis. Ergonomics, 23 (8), 1052-1075. [© Improvement Science Research Network, 2011. http://www.improvementscienceresearch.net/.]en_GB
dc.subjectToolkiten_GB
dc.subjectUlcersen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T10:57:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T10:57:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Improvement Science Research Networken_GB
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