2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203157
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Excellence From the Ground Up
Abstract:
(Improvement Science Research Network) Background: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended expanding opportunities for nurses to lead research and evidence-based quality improvement initiatives that will improve health outcomes and reduce costs. Staff nurses are often aware of care processes and systems that need improvement but lack the time or a well-established infrastructure to address the issues. Developing and implementing a strong infrastructure that will allow frontline nurses to lead teams that create and sustain change is essential. Purpose: To describe Meridian Health’s (MH) innovative program for supporting frontline nurses in leading unit-based teams. Materials and Methods: The Clinical Advancement and Recognition of Excellence (C.A.R.E) Program is a peer-reviewed method of advancement for staff nurses based on documented accomplishments in four areas: clinical expertise, education, shared governance and research. The highest level of advancement is that of Specialty Scholars, staff nurses who lead unit-based (microsystem) quality improvement, clinical research, or evidence-based practice (EBP) projects that result in the implementation of best practices. Scholars are mentored through the process by nurse scientists, clinical experts, and quality improvement specialists. Strong support from nursing leadership as well as system wide coordination among multiple levels of the organization (macrosystem) is a key element in the success of the program. Results: Over 50 projects have been completed and several are in progress. Completed projects have resulted in unit-based improvement, and in some cases, practice changes across the system. Select projects and outcomes will be presented. Conclusions: Recognizing the innate talent and skills of frontline nursing staff and creating the infrastructure to allow those abilities to flourish can produce safe, quality care for patients and families. An impact analysis is currently in the planning stages to capture clinical and financial outcomes of the program. [© Improvement Science Research Network, 2011. http://www.improvementscienceresearch.net/.]
Keywords:
Building; Excellence
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Improvement Science Research Network

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Excellence From the Ground Upen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203157-
dc.description.abstract(Improvement Science Research Network) Background: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended expanding opportunities for nurses to lead research and evidence-based quality improvement initiatives that will improve health outcomes and reduce costs. Staff nurses are often aware of care processes and systems that need improvement but lack the time or a well-established infrastructure to address the issues. Developing and implementing a strong infrastructure that will allow frontline nurses to lead teams that create and sustain change is essential. Purpose: To describe Meridian Health’s (MH) innovative program for supporting frontline nurses in leading unit-based teams. Materials and Methods: The Clinical Advancement and Recognition of Excellence (C.A.R.E) Program is a peer-reviewed method of advancement for staff nurses based on documented accomplishments in four areas: clinical expertise, education, shared governance and research. The highest level of advancement is that of Specialty Scholars, staff nurses who lead unit-based (microsystem) quality improvement, clinical research, or evidence-based practice (EBP) projects that result in the implementation of best practices. Scholars are mentored through the process by nurse scientists, clinical experts, and quality improvement specialists. Strong support from nursing leadership as well as system wide coordination among multiple levels of the organization (macrosystem) is a key element in the success of the program. Results: Over 50 projects have been completed and several are in progress. Completed projects have resulted in unit-based improvement, and in some cases, practice changes across the system. Select projects and outcomes will be presented. Conclusions: Recognizing the innate talent and skills of frontline nursing staff and creating the infrastructure to allow those abilities to flourish can produce safe, quality care for patients and families. An impact analysis is currently in the planning stages to capture clinical and financial outcomes of the program. [© Improvement Science Research Network, 2011. http://www.improvementscienceresearch.net/.]en_GB
dc.subjectBuildingen_GB
dc.subjectExcellenceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T10:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T10:58:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Improvement Science Research Networken_GB
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