2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203176
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sustaining Zero: CLABSI Prevention With Innovation, Accountability and EBP
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Evidence: Literature review suggests routine use of bundle components, checklist use and changes in nursing culture can eliminate or reduce HAIs. Strategy: Unit based "champions" reviewed EBP journal articles, Best Practices and CDC guidelines. Current practices were assessed via monthly line and infection case audits. Attitudes surrounding patient safety and CLABSI prevention were evaluated. Practice Change: CLABSI cases were referred to by the patient’s name bringing a face to CLABSIs thus making infection rates less abstract. Staff were educated on the cost, extension of stay and change in mortality rates based on current evidence. Discussions during daily huddles and staff meetings emphasized CLABSIs as preventable, hospital acquired infections. Education was constantly reinforced. Staff were empowered to hold all medical staff, including physicians, accountable for following bundles. "Safety Rounds" with executive leadership were implemented. Line carts and checklists were updated. New supplies were introduced including alcohol swabs impregnated with Chlorhexidine Gluconate (CHG), and dressings utilizing a CHG impregnated sponge. Lighthearted interventions include bundle education parties, introduction of a 15 second song to sing while “scrubbing the hub”, and humorous posters. Staff was praised for successes. Evaluation: CLABSI surveillance. Results: There have been no CLABSIs in the CCU for over 400 days following the implementation of the aforementioned interventions. Staff report pride in this accomplishment and are using this momentum to tackle other HAIs. Recommendations: Adherence to bundle components and best practice guidelines. Examination of current safety culture. Lessons Learned: Nursing driven change and ownership of processes are vital to changing culture. Frontline nursing staff can and should lead efforts to problem solve these multifaceted, often multidisciplinary issues. Sustaining a rate of zero CLABSIs is attainable through the application of innovation, accountability and evidence-based practice. Bibliography: Hatler C, Hebden, J, Kaler, W and Zack J. (2010) Walk the walk to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections, American Nurse Today, 5(1), 26-32. Kaler, W., Chinn, R. (2007) Successful disinfection of needleless ports: A matter of time and friction. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access,12(1), 140-147. Pronovost, P., Goeschel, & Watson, S. (2010). Sustaining reductions in catheter related bloodstream infections in Michigan intensive care units: observational study. British Medical Journal. 34. Tismit, J., Scwebel, C., Bouadema, L., Geffroy, A., Garrouste-Oregeas, M., Pease, S., …Lucet, J. (2009) Chlorhexidine-impregnated sponges and less frequent dressing changes for prevention of catheter-related infections in critically ill adults. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 301(12), 1231-1241. Zack, J. (2009). Designing a Getting-to-Zero Program That Works for You: A Focus on Process Improvement Infection Control Today, 42-46. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
CLABSI; Prevention
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSustaining Zero: CLABSI Prevention With Innovation, Accountability and EBPen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203176-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Evidence: Literature review suggests routine use of bundle components, checklist use and changes in nursing culture can eliminate or reduce HAIs. Strategy: Unit based "champions" reviewed EBP journal articles, Best Practices and CDC guidelines. Current practices were assessed via monthly line and infection case audits. Attitudes surrounding patient safety and CLABSI prevention were evaluated. Practice Change: CLABSI cases were referred to by the patient’s name bringing a face to CLABSIs thus making infection rates less abstract. Staff were educated on the cost, extension of stay and change in mortality rates based on current evidence. Discussions during daily huddles and staff meetings emphasized CLABSIs as preventable, hospital acquired infections. Education was constantly reinforced. Staff were empowered to hold all medical staff, including physicians, accountable for following bundles. "Safety Rounds" with executive leadership were implemented. Line carts and checklists were updated. New supplies were introduced including alcohol swabs impregnated with Chlorhexidine Gluconate (CHG), and dressings utilizing a CHG impregnated sponge. Lighthearted interventions include bundle education parties, introduction of a 15 second song to sing while “scrubbing the hub”, and humorous posters. Staff was praised for successes. Evaluation: CLABSI surveillance. Results: There have been no CLABSIs in the CCU for over 400 days following the implementation of the aforementioned interventions. Staff report pride in this accomplishment and are using this momentum to tackle other HAIs. Recommendations: Adherence to bundle components and best practice guidelines. Examination of current safety culture. Lessons Learned: Nursing driven change and ownership of processes are vital to changing culture. Frontline nursing staff can and should lead efforts to problem solve these multifaceted, often multidisciplinary issues. Sustaining a rate of zero CLABSIs is attainable through the application of innovation, accountability and evidence-based practice. Bibliography: Hatler C, Hebden, J, Kaler, W and Zack J. (2010) Walk the walk to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections, American Nurse Today, 5(1), 26-32. Kaler, W., Chinn, R. (2007) Successful disinfection of needleless ports: A matter of time and friction. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access,12(1), 140-147. Pronovost, P., Goeschel, & Watson, S. (2010). Sustaining reductions in catheter related bloodstream infections in Michigan intensive care units: observational study. British Medical Journal. 34. Tismit, J., Scwebel, C., Bouadema, L., Geffroy, A., Garrouste-Oregeas, M., Pease, S., …Lucet, J. (2009) Chlorhexidine-impregnated sponges and less frequent dressing changes for prevention of catheter-related infections in critically ill adults. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 301(12), 1231-1241. Zack, J. (2009). Designing a Getting-to-Zero Program That Works for You: A Focus on Process Improvement Infection Control Today, 42-46. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectCLABSIen_GB
dc.subjectPreventionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:01:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:01:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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