2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203184
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Demonstrating the different processes of 'sampling' usingM&M's
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: One of the integral components of research study design is the concept of sampling. Novice nurse researchers may lack understanding and experience with the use of sampling as a working component of the research process. Evidence: Choosing a sampling strategy to ensure that the targeted population is well represented in a study is key to ensuring that findings will be able to be generalized to patients in other settings. Strategy: The Great American Cookie Experiment [GACE] Nursing Research Program© in a large healthcare setting in the Southwest offers a series of 14 classes for novice nurse researchers to learn how to develop a research protocol, navigate the IRB process, conduct a study, analyze data, and disseminate study findings. One of the classes provides information about sampling using bags of M&M candies and a set of practical exercises. Practice Change: The sampling class provided nurses with a basic comprehensive understanding of sampling strategies by providing hands on experience in sample selection and learning how to justify a sampling strategy in study design. Types of sampling demonstrated in the exercises were: convenience sampling, quota sampling, purposive sampling, single random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, & systematic sampling. Evaluation: When queried about the sampling class experience in program evaluations, nurses expressed that the M&M exercises were creative, fun, and enhanced learning. Results: The hands-on experience of drawing samples from a population comprised of six colors of M&Ms provided visual reinforcement of how different sampling strategies can be used to assure that a study sample is representative of a population. Recommendations: Using M&Ms to select a variety of samples provides a non-intimidating activity that can ensure engagement of nurses‘ attention and interest and aided in sampling knowledge retention. Lessons Learned: Using a convenience sampling strategy does not always offer the most representative sample. Careful consideration of how a sample will be selected can strengthen a study design. Bibliography: LoBiondo-Wood, G. & Haber, J. (2006). Nursing research: Methods and Critical Appraisal for Evidence-Based Practice, 6th Ed. St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Processes; Sampling
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Demonstrating the different processes of 'sampling' usingM&M'sen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203184-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: One of the integral components of research study design is the concept of sampling. Novice nurse researchers may lack understanding and experience with the use of sampling as a working component of the research process. Evidence: Choosing a sampling strategy to ensure that the targeted population is well represented in a study is key to ensuring that findings will be able to be generalized to patients in other settings. Strategy: The Great American Cookie Experiment [GACE] Nursing Research Program© in a large healthcare setting in the Southwest offers a series of 14 classes for novice nurse researchers to learn how to develop a research protocol, navigate the IRB process, conduct a study, analyze data, and disseminate study findings. One of the classes provides information about sampling using bags of M&M candies and a set of practical exercises. Practice Change: The sampling class provided nurses with a basic comprehensive understanding of sampling strategies by providing hands on experience in sample selection and learning how to justify a sampling strategy in study design. Types of sampling demonstrated in the exercises were: convenience sampling, quota sampling, purposive sampling, single random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, & systematic sampling. Evaluation: When queried about the sampling class experience in program evaluations, nurses expressed that the M&M exercises were creative, fun, and enhanced learning. Results: The hands-on experience of drawing samples from a population comprised of six colors of M&Ms provided visual reinforcement of how different sampling strategies can be used to assure that a study sample is representative of a population. Recommendations: Using M&Ms to select a variety of samples provides a non-intimidating activity that can ensure engagement of nurses‘ attention and interest and aided in sampling knowledge retention. Lessons Learned: Using a convenience sampling strategy does not always offer the most representative sample. Careful consideration of how a sample will be selected can strengthen a study design. Bibliography: LoBiondo-Wood, G. & Haber, J. (2006). Nursing research: Methods and Critical Appraisal for Evidence-Based Practice, 6th Ed. St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectProcessesen_GB
dc.subjectSamplingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:02:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:02:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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