2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203194
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Normothermia in Colo-Rectal Surgical Patients
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Hypothermia is a consequence of surgery and anesthesia, with unplanned hypothermia ranking among the most common complications of surgery. Patients with mild perioperative hypothermia have three times as many culture-positive surgical wound infections as normothermic patients. Baseline data in our PACU revealed that of 25 open colo-rectal surgery patients, 10 (40%) were hypothermic (temp<96.8F) on arrival to PACU. Evidence: A review of literature confirmed that preventing hypothermia by using warming techniques reduces post-operative complications. Patients can also experience a greater level of comfort, have shorter length of stay, and reduce hospital costs. Strategy: For this nurse driven quality improvement project and Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) initiative, a team comprised of nurses, surgeons, and anesthesiologists was formed to identify causes of hypothermia and practice changes that would reduce hypothermia in open-rectal surgical patients. Practice: Education on the negative consequences of hypothermia and the use of warming techniques was conducted. Incidental findings of variation in technique used to obtain temperatures resulted in re-education and in-service instruction by product vendor. Through education and support a change in attitude from resistance to enthusiasm occurred. Evaluation: After intra-operative warming devices were initiated, hypothermia was reduced from 40% to 16%. Although this was a significant improvement, further literature review of warming techniques was conducted. As a result, pre-operative warming interventions were implemented. Results: Outcome data - with the use of both pre-operative and intra-operative warming interventions 100% of patients were normothermic on arrival to the PACU. Surgeons now include pre-operative warming applications in their order sets. Warming techniques are currently being implemented with all surgical patients. Recommendations: Prior to instituting a practice change, use current evidence to educate and re-educate personnel on its importance to quality patient care. Lessons learned: The importance of looking beyond current practice to implement changes that will improve patient outcomes; sharing information and celebrating results for more buy-in; being creative and consistent in encouraging and motivating team members. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Normothermia; Surgical
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNormothermia in Colo-Rectal Surgical Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203194-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Hypothermia is a consequence of surgery and anesthesia, with unplanned hypothermia ranking among the most common complications of surgery. Patients with mild perioperative hypothermia have three times as many culture-positive surgical wound infections as normothermic patients. Baseline data in our PACU revealed that of 25 open colo-rectal surgery patients, 10 (40%) were hypothermic (temp<96.8F) on arrival to PACU. Evidence: A review of literature confirmed that preventing hypothermia by using warming techniques reduces post-operative complications. Patients can also experience a greater level of comfort, have shorter length of stay, and reduce hospital costs. Strategy: For this nurse driven quality improvement project and Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) initiative, a team comprised of nurses, surgeons, and anesthesiologists was formed to identify causes of hypothermia and practice changes that would reduce hypothermia in open-rectal surgical patients. Practice: Education on the negative consequences of hypothermia and the use of warming techniques was conducted. Incidental findings of variation in technique used to obtain temperatures resulted in re-education and in-service instruction by product vendor. Through education and support a change in attitude from resistance to enthusiasm occurred. Evaluation: After intra-operative warming devices were initiated, hypothermia was reduced from 40% to 16%. Although this was a significant improvement, further literature review of warming techniques was conducted. As a result, pre-operative warming interventions were implemented. Results: Outcome data - with the use of both pre-operative and intra-operative warming interventions 100% of patients were normothermic on arrival to the PACU. Surgeons now include pre-operative warming applications in their order sets. Warming techniques are currently being implemented with all surgical patients. Recommendations: Prior to instituting a practice change, use current evidence to educate and re-educate personnel on its importance to quality patient care. Lessons learned: The importance of looking beyond current practice to implement changes that will improve patient outcomes; sharing information and celebrating results for more buy-in; being creative and consistent in encouraging and motivating team members. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectNormothermiaen_GB
dc.subjectSurgicalen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:02:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:02:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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