14.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203199
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Compassion Fatigue Ratings among Healthcare Workers
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Compassion Fatigue is described as “the negative effects on clinicians due to working with traumatized clients” (Bride, Radey & Figley, 2007). Quality of work may be affected by lack of ability to nurture (Bride, etal, 2007; Joinson, 1992), poor job attitude, lack of concern, lateness and/or absenteeism, (Collins & Long, 2003). Evidence: Studies have shown increased awareness for compassion fatigue, its toll on health care workers, and means for its prevention and management. Providing care, compassion and empathy to patients takes a toll on an individual, and can cause healthcare providers to have less compassion and empathy for the suffering of others. Strategy: The purpose of this study is to determine: 1) is there a difference in compassion fatigue scores between departments and 2) is there a difference in scores between licensed and non-licensed employees and 3) is there a difference between stationary staff and “floating” staff and 4) are there predictors related to compassion fatigue scores. Practice Change: An exploratory study with predictive design was used to collect data from 253 staff members. A questionnaire accompanied the Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue (ProQOL) Version 5 (2009) survey. This tool measures professional quality of life. Evaluation and Results: Data was collected for a 55% response rate. 65% of employees scored within the “average” range of compassion satisfaction; 60% scored within the “low” range of burnout; and 76% scored within the “low” range of secondary traumatic stress. Favorable subscale predictors were also identified. Recommendations: Limitations of this study include the self-reporting instrument that was used and convenience sampling. It is possible employees answered based on perceptions about desirable responses since unfavorable scores were rare. Lessons Learned: Findings add to the literature regarding differences and relationships among variables of work setting, occupation, and levels of compassion fatigue. Predictors add to the knowledge base and suggest what may be done to improve levels of compassion fatigue among healthcare workers. Bibliography Bride, B. E., Radey, M., & Figley, C. R. (2007). Measuring Compassion Fatigue. Clinical Social Work Journal, 35: 155-163. Coetzee, S. K., & Klopper, H. C. (2010). Compassion fatigue within nursing practice: A concept analysis. Nursing and Health Sciences, 12: 235-243. Frandsen, B. M. (2010). Burnout or compassion fatigue? Long Term Living, 59(5): 50-52. Gentry, J. E. (2002). Compassion Fatigue: A Crucible of Transformation. Journal of Trauma Practice, 1(3/4): 37-61. Joinson, C. (1992). Coping with compassion fatigue. Nursing; 22:118-121. Kanste, O. (2008). The association between leadership behavior and burnout among nursing personnel in health care. Nordic Journal of Nursing Research and Clinical Studies/Vard I Norden, 28(3), 4-8. Kashani, M., Eliasson, A., Chrosniak, L., Vernalis, M. (2010). Taking aim at nurse stress: a call to action. Military Medicine, 175 (2),96-100. Meadors, P. & Lamson, A. (2008). Compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization: Provider self care on intensive care units for children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 22, 24-34. Doi:10.1016/j.pedhc.2007.01.006 Najjar, N., Davis, L., Beck-Coon, K., & Carney Doebbeling, C. (2009). Compassion fatigue: a review of the research to date and relevance to cancer-care providers. Journal of Health Psychology, 14(2), 267-277. Paghosyan, L., Clarke, S.P., Finlayson, M., & Aiken, L.H. (2010) Nurse Burnout and Quality of Care: Cross-National Investigation in Six Countries. Research in Nursing & Health, 33, 288-298. Rella, S., Winwood, P.C., & Lushington, K. (2008). When does nursing burnout begin? An investigation of the fatigue experience of Australian nursing student. Journal of Nursing Management, 17(7), 886-897. Sabo, B.M. (2006). Compassion fatigue and nursing work: can we accurately capture the consequences of caring work?. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 12,136-142. doi10.1111/j.1440-172X.2006.00562.x Shirom, A. (2009). Epilogue: mapping future research on burnout and health. Stress and Health, 25, 375-380. Doi: 10.1002/smi.1284 Shorter, M. & Stayt, L. C. (2009). Critical care nurses’ experiences of grief in an adult intensive care unit. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(1), 159-167. Sundin, L., Hochwalder, J., Bildt, C., & Lisspers, J. (2007). The relationship between different work-related sources of social support and burnout among registered and assistant nurses in Sweden: A questionnaire survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 44, 758-769. Doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2006.01.004 Tehrani, N. (2007). The cost of caring-the impact of secondary trauma on assumptions, values and beliefs. Counseling Psychology Quarterly, 20(4), 325-339. Van Bogaert, P., Meulemans, H., Clarke, S., Vermeyen, K., & Van de Heyning, P. (2009). Hospital nurse practice environment, burnout, job outcomes and quality of care: test of a structural equation model. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65, 2175-2185. Doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2009.05082.x [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Fatigue; Workers
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Compassion Fatigue Ratings among Healthcare Workersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203199-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Compassion Fatigue is described as “the negative effects on clinicians due to working with traumatized clients” (Bride, Radey & Figley, 2007). Quality of work may be affected by lack of ability to nurture (Bride, etal, 2007; Joinson, 1992), poor job attitude, lack of concern, lateness and/or absenteeism, (Collins & Long, 2003). Evidence: Studies have shown increased awareness for compassion fatigue, its toll on health care workers, and means for its prevention and management. Providing care, compassion and empathy to patients takes a toll on an individual, and can cause healthcare providers to have less compassion and empathy for the suffering of others. Strategy: The purpose of this study is to determine: 1) is there a difference in compassion fatigue scores between departments and 2) is there a difference in scores between licensed and non-licensed employees and 3) is there a difference between stationary staff and “floating” staff and 4) are there predictors related to compassion fatigue scores. Practice Change: An exploratory study with predictive design was used to collect data from 253 staff members. A questionnaire accompanied the Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue (ProQOL) Version 5 (2009) survey. This tool measures professional quality of life. Evaluation and Results: Data was collected for a 55% response rate. 65% of employees scored within the “average” range of compassion satisfaction; 60% scored within the “low” range of burnout; and 76% scored within the “low” range of secondary traumatic stress. Favorable subscale predictors were also identified. Recommendations: Limitations of this study include the self-reporting instrument that was used and convenience sampling. It is possible employees answered based on perceptions about desirable responses since unfavorable scores were rare. Lessons Learned: Findings add to the literature regarding differences and relationships among variables of work setting, occupation, and levels of compassion fatigue. Predictors add to the knowledge base and suggest what may be done to improve levels of compassion fatigue among healthcare workers. Bibliography Bride, B. E., Radey, M., & Figley, C. R. (2007). Measuring Compassion Fatigue. Clinical Social Work Journal, 35: 155-163. Coetzee, S. K., & Klopper, H. C. (2010). Compassion fatigue within nursing practice: A concept analysis. Nursing and Health Sciences, 12: 235-243. Frandsen, B. M. (2010). Burnout or compassion fatigue? Long Term Living, 59(5): 50-52. Gentry, J. E. (2002). Compassion Fatigue: A Crucible of Transformation. Journal of Trauma Practice, 1(3/4): 37-61. Joinson, C. (1992). Coping with compassion fatigue. Nursing; 22:118-121. Kanste, O. (2008). The association between leadership behavior and burnout among nursing personnel in health care. Nordic Journal of Nursing Research and Clinical Studies/Vard I Norden, 28(3), 4-8. Kashani, M., Eliasson, A., Chrosniak, L., Vernalis, M. (2010). Taking aim at nurse stress: a call to action. Military Medicine, 175 (2),96-100. Meadors, P. & Lamson, A. (2008). Compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization: Provider self care on intensive care units for children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 22, 24-34. Doi:10.1016/j.pedhc.2007.01.006 Najjar, N., Davis, L., Beck-Coon, K., & Carney Doebbeling, C. (2009). Compassion fatigue: a review of the research to date and relevance to cancer-care providers. Journal of Health Psychology, 14(2), 267-277. Paghosyan, L., Clarke, S.P., Finlayson, M., & Aiken, L.H. (2010) Nurse Burnout and Quality of Care: Cross-National Investigation in Six Countries. Research in Nursing & Health, 33, 288-298. Rella, S., Winwood, P.C., & Lushington, K. (2008). When does nursing burnout begin? An investigation of the fatigue experience of Australian nursing student. Journal of Nursing Management, 17(7), 886-897. Sabo, B.M. (2006). Compassion fatigue and nursing work: can we accurately capture the consequences of caring work?. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 12,136-142. doi10.1111/j.1440-172X.2006.00562.x Shirom, A. (2009). Epilogue: mapping future research on burnout and health. Stress and Health, 25, 375-380. Doi: 10.1002/smi.1284 Shorter, M. & Stayt, L. C. (2009). Critical care nurses’ experiences of grief in an adult intensive care unit. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(1), 159-167. Sundin, L., Hochwalder, J., Bildt, C., & Lisspers, J. (2007). The relationship between different work-related sources of social support and burnout among registered and assistant nurses in Sweden: A questionnaire survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 44, 758-769. Doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2006.01.004 Tehrani, N. (2007). The cost of caring-the impact of secondary trauma on assumptions, values and beliefs. Counseling Psychology Quarterly, 20(4), 325-339. Van Bogaert, P., Meulemans, H., Clarke, S., Vermeyen, K., & Van de Heyning, P. (2009). Hospital nurse practice environment, burnout, job outcomes and quality of care: test of a structural equation model. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65, 2175-2185. Doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2009.05082.x [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectFatigueen_GB
dc.subjectWorkersen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:02:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:02:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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