2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Craniosacral Therapy in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)/sensory integration (SI) are among the highest consumers of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) treatments, including Craniosacral Therapy (CST). Seventy-four percent of families who report use of CAM treatments are using it for children who are autistic. Although families look to physicians to find alternative treatments, physicians may lack openness to understanding these therapies and engaging parents in discussing CAM treatments. Thus parents try CAM therapies with little information and without sharing CAM results with their physicians. Evidence: There is no definitive evidence of the effectiveness of CST for children with ASD/SI. There is some evidence to support the use of massage therapy, often used in conjunction with CST, to improve behavior and sleep issues. Several published reports from providers who practice CST as well as the author’s clinical experience describe improvements in behavior, anxiety and ability to focus following regular treatments of CST. Strategy: Identify and implement tools to measure effects of regular CST treatments on behavior in children with ASD/SI. Practice Change & Evaluation: Standardize the use of pre- and post-evaluation tool. Through a questionnaire, capture parents’/teachers’ observations of behaviors that they attribute to CST. Results: Present preliminary data on clinical outcomes associated with CST compared to patient status prior to regular treatment. Recommendations: The clinical use of standardized evaluation tools will provide preliminary data to guide future research. Lessons Learned: Lack of research demonstrates the challenges of determining the effectiveness of CST. Families seek CST to improve children’s ability to learn, socially interact and feel well. Families need guidance in finding safe and effective CAM therapies. More research is needed to provide this guidance and must be rigorous while accounting for the therapeutic relationship dynamic that is integral to the philosophy of integrative care. Bibliography: Akins, R. S., Angkustsiri, K., & Hansen, R. L. (2010). Complementary and alternative medicine in autism: An evidence-based approach to negotiating safe and efficacious interventions with families. Neurotherapeutics: The Journal of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics, 7(3), 307-319. Escalona, A., Field, T., Singer-Strunck, R., Cullen, C., & Hartshorn, K. (2001). Brief report: Improvements in the behavior of children with autism following massage therapy. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 31(5), 513-516. Gillespie, B. R. (2009). Case study in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: The corrective aspect of craniosacral fascial therapy. Explore: The Journal of Science & Healing, 5(5), 296-298. Green, C., Martin, C. W., Bassett, K., & Kazanjian, A. (1999). A systematic review of craniosacral therapy: Biological plausibility, assessment reliability and clinical effectiveness. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 7(4), 201-207. Hanson, E., Kalish, L. A., Bunce, E., Curtis, C., McDaniel, S., Ware, J., & Petry, J. (2007). Use of complementary and alternative medicine among children diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 37(4), 628-636. Levy, S. E., & Hyman, S. L. (2005). Novel treatments for autistic spectrum disorders. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 11(2), 131-142. Low, E., Murray, D. M., O'Mahony, O., & O'B Hourihane, J. (2008). Complementary and alternative medicine use in irish paediatric patients. Irish Journal of Medical Science, 177(2), 147-150. Mehl-Madrona, L., Kligler, B., Silverman, S., Lynton, H., & Merrell, W. (2007). The impact of acupuncture and craniosacral therapy interventions on clinical outcomes in adults with asthma. Explore: The Journal of Science & Healing, 3(1), 28-36. Upledger, J. E. (1978). The relationship of craniosacral examination findings in grade school children with developmental problems. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, 77(10), 760-776. Weber, W., & Newmark, S. (2007). Complementary and alternative medical therapies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 54(6), 983. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Craniosacral; Autism
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCraniosacral Therapy in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203208-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)/sensory integration (SI) are among the highest consumers of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) treatments, including Craniosacral Therapy (CST). Seventy-four percent of families who report use of CAM treatments are using it for children who are autistic. Although families look to physicians to find alternative treatments, physicians may lack openness to understanding these therapies and engaging parents in discussing CAM treatments. Thus parents try CAM therapies with little information and without sharing CAM results with their physicians. Evidence: There is no definitive evidence of the effectiveness of CST for children with ASD/SI. There is some evidence to support the use of massage therapy, often used in conjunction with CST, to improve behavior and sleep issues. Several published reports from providers who practice CST as well as the author’s clinical experience describe improvements in behavior, anxiety and ability to focus following regular treatments of CST. Strategy: Identify and implement tools to measure effects of regular CST treatments on behavior in children with ASD/SI. Practice Change & Evaluation: Standardize the use of pre- and post-evaluation tool. Through a questionnaire, capture parents’/teachers’ observations of behaviors that they attribute to CST. Results: Present preliminary data on clinical outcomes associated with CST compared to patient status prior to regular treatment. Recommendations: The clinical use of standardized evaluation tools will provide preliminary data to guide future research. Lessons Learned: Lack of research demonstrates the challenges of determining the effectiveness of CST. Families seek CST to improve children’s ability to learn, socially interact and feel well. Families need guidance in finding safe and effective CAM therapies. More research is needed to provide this guidance and must be rigorous while accounting for the therapeutic relationship dynamic that is integral to the philosophy of integrative care. Bibliography: Akins, R. S., Angkustsiri, K., & Hansen, R. L. (2010). Complementary and alternative medicine in autism: An evidence-based approach to negotiating safe and efficacious interventions with families. Neurotherapeutics: The Journal of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics, 7(3), 307-319. Escalona, A., Field, T., Singer-Strunck, R., Cullen, C., & Hartshorn, K. (2001). Brief report: Improvements in the behavior of children with autism following massage therapy. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 31(5), 513-516. Gillespie, B. R. (2009). Case study in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: The corrective aspect of craniosacral fascial therapy. Explore: The Journal of Science & Healing, 5(5), 296-298. Green, C., Martin, C. W., Bassett, K., & Kazanjian, A. (1999). A systematic review of craniosacral therapy: Biological plausibility, assessment reliability and clinical effectiveness. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 7(4), 201-207. Hanson, E., Kalish, L. A., Bunce, E., Curtis, C., McDaniel, S., Ware, J., & Petry, J. (2007). Use of complementary and alternative medicine among children diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 37(4), 628-636. Levy, S. E., & Hyman, S. L. (2005). Novel treatments for autistic spectrum disorders. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 11(2), 131-142. Low, E., Murray, D. M., O'Mahony, O., & O'B Hourihane, J. (2008). Complementary and alternative medicine use in irish paediatric patients. Irish Journal of Medical Science, 177(2), 147-150. Mehl-Madrona, L., Kligler, B., Silverman, S., Lynton, H., & Merrell, W. (2007). The impact of acupuncture and craniosacral therapy interventions on clinical outcomes in adults with asthma. Explore: The Journal of Science & Healing, 3(1), 28-36. Upledger, J. E. (1978). The relationship of craniosacral examination findings in grade school children with developmental problems. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, 77(10), 760-776. Weber, W., & Newmark, S. (2007). Complementary and alternative medical therapies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 54(6), 983. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectCraniosacralen_GB
dc.subjectAutismen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:03:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:03:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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