2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203210
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based, Multi-track Preceptorship Program Pilot in a Burn ICU
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: As advances in technology expand, the demand for highly trained nurses remains high. Most newly hired nurses to a Burn ICU come with some exposure to critical care, but have limited experience with burns. Evidence: The general consensus among Burn ICU staff at the US Army Institute of Surgical Research indicated it took several years to make a new hire proficient in burn wound care. This is an opinion generally held by bedside nurses, doctors, and management. An informal survey of new hires reflected a level of anxiety concerning burn wound care up to two years after orientation. Strategy: A FOCUS-PDCA process and Benner's Novice to Expert Theory were the foundations to develop an evidence-based, standardized, comprehensive preceptor program to ensure new nurse hires could provide nursing care at a safe and competent level. Practice Change: A nurse-led Preceptor EBP team developed a program of formal preceptor training. They also developed didactic instruction, resume review, and entry interviews for preceptees as a way to match them with the appropriate preceptor. The program incorporated use of the Basic Knowledge Assessment Test 7 (BKAT 7) as a tool for verifying knowledge and determining areas for improvement. Emphasis was placed on the importance of a committee of experienced nurses and using the team concept to maximize learning opportunities. Additionally, preceptors were chosen based on their level of experience and their ability to constructively share their knowledge. Evaluation: Formal program evaluation from the preceptor and preceptee was conducted. Results: Eleven employees completed the program. The average preceptee was in the program 6 weeks (range 3-8 weeks). Interviews of preceptors, staff and new hires conducted upon completion of orientation indicate there is a higher level of confidence in new nurse hires. The preceptor program demonstrated how a burn ICU developed nurses with no burn care experience into nurses with burn care competence. Recommendations: This EB Preceptorship Program is being piloted Burn Center-wide. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Program; ICU
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based, Multi-track Preceptorship Program Pilot in a Burn ICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203210-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: As advances in technology expand, the demand for highly trained nurses remains high. Most newly hired nurses to a Burn ICU come with some exposure to critical care, but have limited experience with burns. Evidence: The general consensus among Burn ICU staff at the US Army Institute of Surgical Research indicated it took several years to make a new hire proficient in burn wound care. This is an opinion generally held by bedside nurses, doctors, and management. An informal survey of new hires reflected a level of anxiety concerning burn wound care up to two years after orientation. Strategy: A FOCUS-PDCA process and Benner's Novice to Expert Theory were the foundations to develop an evidence-based, standardized, comprehensive preceptor program to ensure new nurse hires could provide nursing care at a safe and competent level. Practice Change: A nurse-led Preceptor EBP team developed a program of formal preceptor training. They also developed didactic instruction, resume review, and entry interviews for preceptees as a way to match them with the appropriate preceptor. The program incorporated use of the Basic Knowledge Assessment Test 7 (BKAT 7) as a tool for verifying knowledge and determining areas for improvement. Emphasis was placed on the importance of a committee of experienced nurses and using the team concept to maximize learning opportunities. Additionally, preceptors were chosen based on their level of experience and their ability to constructively share their knowledge. Evaluation: Formal program evaluation from the preceptor and preceptee was conducted. Results: Eleven employees completed the program. The average preceptee was in the program 6 weeks (range 3-8 weeks). Interviews of preceptors, staff and new hires conducted upon completion of orientation indicate there is a higher level of confidence in new nurse hires. The preceptor program demonstrated how a burn ICU developed nurses with no burn care experience into nurses with burn care competence. Recommendations: This EB Preceptorship Program is being piloted Burn Center-wide. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectProgramen_GB
dc.subjectICUen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:03:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:03:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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