2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203216
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PDAs for a Safer Nursing Practice or PDAs within the Learning Environment
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Introduction: In an effort to assist a safer nursing practice, PDAs were implemented into the undergraduate curriculum at our university in 2008 and studied to critique the characteristics of personal digital assistant (PDA) use in both clinical and classroom for baccalaureate nursing students (BSN) within a rural Texas university, over their structured nursing program. Background: PDAs/information technology support of patient care was desired due to the complexity and risks involved with providing clinical care today. Evaluation of this implementation was completed in 2010. Level of Educational Program: Undergraduate nursing students. Targeted Learning outcomes: The learning outcomes involved beginning to use assistive devices in clinical and classroom settings to assist students with their learning. First year nursing students’ use of PDAs throughout their nursing program (with a sample size of 75 students at curriculum completion at the end of the study's two year period) was investigated. Structured and open-ended questions were used to assess their use and perspective of PDA s/information technology. Teaching/Learning Activities: Nursing students varied in relation to PDA uptake and use over the program’s initiation. The best utilization was demonstrated by early adapters of the new technology, those comfortable with information technology, and those with strong relationships with those also up taking the technology. Barriers were costs and perceived hindrances to the technology. Evaluation of Approach: PDAs can assist those that engage in their use to gain advantages in clinical knowledge and current practice recommendations, and possibly provide a safer clinical environment. There is a learning curve that is required to be experienced by all students as they engage with this new learning method. Some students are more adaptable to this form of technology than others. Bibliography: Altman, T. K., & Brady, D. (2005). PDAs bring information competency to the point-of-care. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 2(1), article 10, accessed September 23, 2010 from: http://www.bepress.com/ijnes/vol2/iss1/art10. Brubaker, C. L., Ruthman, J., & Walloch, J. A. (2009). The usefulness of personal digital assistants (PDAs) for nursing students in the clinical setting: A pilot study. Nursing Education Perspectives, 30(6), 390-392. Doran, S., Jolly, B., Klinger, J. M., & Tupper, J. (2010). Wide-ranging collaborative drives improvement in patient safety. Healthcare Benchmarks and Quality Improvement, January, 1-4. Doran, D. M., Haynes, B., Kushniruk, A., Straus, S., Grimshaw, J., McGillis, … Jedras, D. (2010). Supporting evidence based practice for nurses through information technologies. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Practice, First Quarter, 7(1), 4-15. Farrell, M. J., & Rose, L. (2008). Use of mobile handheld computers in clinical nursing education. Journal of Nursing Education, 47(1), 13-19. Faulk, J. F., & Savitz, L. A. (2009). Intensive care nurses’ interest in clinical personal digital assistants. Critical Care Nurse, 29(5), 58-64. Koeniger-Donohue, R. (2008). Handheld computers in nursing education: A pilot project. Journal of Nursing Education, 47(2), 74-77. Lai, C.-H., Yang, J.-C., Chen, F.-C., Ho, C.-W., & Chan, T.-W. (2007). Affordance of mobile technologies for experiential learning: The interplay of technology and pedagogical practices. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 23, 326-337. Lee, T.-T. (2006). Adopting a personal digital assistant system: Application of Lewin’s change theory. Nursing and Healthcare Management and Policy, 487-496. Lewin K. (1951) Field Theory in Social Science. Harper& Row: New York. U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2010). The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules. Accessed December 1, 2010, from: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/. Williams, M. G., & Dittmer, A. (2009). Textbooks on tap: Using electronic books housed in handheld devices in nursing clinical courses. Nursing Education Perspectives, July/August, 30(4), 220-225. Zurmehly, J. (2010). Personal digital assistants (PDAs): Review and evaluation. Nursing Education Perspectives, May/June, 31(3), 179-182. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
PDAs; Nursing Practice
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePDAs for a Safer Nursing Practice or PDAs within the Learning Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203216-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Introduction: In an effort to assist a safer nursing practice, PDAs were implemented into the undergraduate curriculum at our university in 2008 and studied to critique the characteristics of personal digital assistant (PDA) use in both clinical and classroom for baccalaureate nursing students (BSN) within a rural Texas university, over their structured nursing program. Background: PDAs/information technology support of patient care was desired due to the complexity and risks involved with providing clinical care today. Evaluation of this implementation was completed in 2010. Level of Educational Program: Undergraduate nursing students. Targeted Learning outcomes: The learning outcomes involved beginning to use assistive devices in clinical and classroom settings to assist students with their learning. First year nursing students’ use of PDAs throughout their nursing program (with a sample size of 75 students at curriculum completion at the end of the study's two year period) was investigated. Structured and open-ended questions were used to assess their use and perspective of PDA s/information technology. Teaching/Learning Activities: Nursing students varied in relation to PDA uptake and use over the program’s initiation. The best utilization was demonstrated by early adapters of the new technology, those comfortable with information technology, and those with strong relationships with those also up taking the technology. Barriers were costs and perceived hindrances to the technology. Evaluation of Approach: PDAs can assist those that engage in their use to gain advantages in clinical knowledge and current practice recommendations, and possibly provide a safer clinical environment. There is a learning curve that is required to be experienced by all students as they engage with this new learning method. Some students are more adaptable to this form of technology than others. Bibliography: Altman, T. K., & Brady, D. (2005). PDAs bring information competency to the point-of-care. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 2(1), article 10, accessed September 23, 2010 from: http://www.bepress.com/ijnes/vol2/iss1/art10. Brubaker, C. L., Ruthman, J., & Walloch, J. A. (2009). The usefulness of personal digital assistants (PDAs) for nursing students in the clinical setting: A pilot study. Nursing Education Perspectives, 30(6), 390-392. Doran, S., Jolly, B., Klinger, J. M., & Tupper, J. (2010). Wide-ranging collaborative drives improvement in patient safety. Healthcare Benchmarks and Quality Improvement, January, 1-4. Doran, D. M., Haynes, B., Kushniruk, A., Straus, S., Grimshaw, J., McGillis, … Jedras, D. (2010). Supporting evidence based practice for nurses through information technologies. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Practice, First Quarter, 7(1), 4-15. Farrell, M. J., & Rose, L. (2008). Use of mobile handheld computers in clinical nursing education. Journal of Nursing Education, 47(1), 13-19. Faulk, J. F., & Savitz, L. A. (2009). Intensive care nurses’ interest in clinical personal digital assistants. Critical Care Nurse, 29(5), 58-64. Koeniger-Donohue, R. (2008). Handheld computers in nursing education: A pilot project. Journal of Nursing Education, 47(2), 74-77. Lai, C.-H., Yang, J.-C., Chen, F.-C., Ho, C.-W., & Chan, T.-W. (2007). Affordance of mobile technologies for experiential learning: The interplay of technology and pedagogical practices. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 23, 326-337. Lee, T.-T. (2006). Adopting a personal digital assistant system: Application of Lewin’s change theory. Nursing and Healthcare Management and Policy, 487-496. Lewin K. (1951) Field Theory in Social Science. Harper& Row: New York. U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2010). The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules. Accessed December 1, 2010, from: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/. Williams, M. G., & Dittmer, A. (2009). Textbooks on tap: Using electronic books housed in handheld devices in nursing clinical courses. Nursing Education Perspectives, July/August, 30(4), 220-225. Zurmehly, J. (2010). Personal digital assistants (PDAs): Review and evaluation. Nursing Education Perspectives, May/June, 31(3), 179-182. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectPDAsen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Practiceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:03:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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