2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203219
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tobacco Cessation: More Than Just Patient Education!
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: “Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. accounting for approximately 443,000 deaths or 1 in 5 deaths in the US each year”.1 More than 6,000 Oklahomans die annually from smoking related illnesses at a cost of $1.2 billion dollars each year, 2,3 above the U.S. national average.4 (Oklahoma ranks 49th in the nation for adult smoking prevalence (25.5%).5 Evidence: Substantial research in this area culminated with the publication of Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Clinical Practice Guideline 2008 Update. The graded recommendations are based on meta-analyses from multiple well designed randomized control trials.6 Strategy: Develop and implement sustainable hospital system changes resulting in a decrease in tobacco dependence among Oklahomans. Practice Change: A partnership among state agencies/organizations and a multi-hospital healthcare system was established. A multi-professional team collaborated and developed a process based on evidence-based clinical guidelines recommendations. Evaluation: Numbers of referrals to the Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline – contracted service through the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust track number of referrals, numbers who agree to follow up, levels of calls, and long term cessation rates. Results: Outcomes associated with this referral program are twice the national average for utilization of this type of program. INTEGRIS referrals account for 46% of all Oklahoma referrals and 41% of those referred accept additional support (compared to 21% nationally). Recommendations: Ongoing evaluation to determine impact of program upon full implementation will be required, including long-term sustainability. It will be important to determine the impact of this program on the numbers of Oklahomans who become and remain former smokers. Lessons Learned: System change is essential to effective implementation and results. Dedicated staff is necessary to develop and coordinate system changes. Multi-professional team is needed to successful practice change. Partnering between healthcare organizations and state hospital associations proved beneficial in the development and implementation the intervention. Bibliography: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Annual smoking - attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and economic costs - United States, 1995-1999. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly. 2002;51(14):300-303. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5114a2.htm. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State-Specific Smoking-Attributable Mortality and Years of Potential Life Lost—United States, 2000–2004. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2009;58(2):29-33. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5802a2.htm . 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health, United States. Hyattsville (MD): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2009. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm 4. Oklahoma State Department of Health. Fewer Tobacco Users: Oklahoma State Plan for Tobacco Use Prevention & Cessation Oklahoma State Department of Health; 2010. 5. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. Key State-Specific Tobacco-Related Data & Rankings. Fact Sheet 2010. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0176.pdf. 6. Fiore Mea. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Evidence Based Clinical Practice Guideline. Rockport, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2008. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Tobacco; Education
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTobacco Cessation: More Than Just Patient Education!en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203219-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: “Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. accounting for approximately 443,000 deaths or 1 in 5 deaths in the US each year”.1 More than 6,000 Oklahomans die annually from smoking related illnesses at a cost of $1.2 billion dollars each year, 2,3 above the U.S. national average.4 (Oklahoma ranks 49th in the nation for adult smoking prevalence (25.5%).5 Evidence: Substantial research in this area culminated with the publication of Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Clinical Practice Guideline 2008 Update. The graded recommendations are based on meta-analyses from multiple well designed randomized control trials.6 Strategy: Develop and implement sustainable hospital system changes resulting in a decrease in tobacco dependence among Oklahomans. Practice Change: A partnership among state agencies/organizations and a multi-hospital healthcare system was established. A multi-professional team collaborated and developed a process based on evidence-based clinical guidelines recommendations. Evaluation: Numbers of referrals to the Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline – contracted service through the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust track number of referrals, numbers who agree to follow up, levels of calls, and long term cessation rates. Results: Outcomes associated with this referral program are twice the national average for utilization of this type of program. INTEGRIS referrals account for 46% of all Oklahoma referrals and 41% of those referred accept additional support (compared to 21% nationally). Recommendations: Ongoing evaluation to determine impact of program upon full implementation will be required, including long-term sustainability. It will be important to determine the impact of this program on the numbers of Oklahomans who become and remain former smokers. Lessons Learned: System change is essential to effective implementation and results. Dedicated staff is necessary to develop and coordinate system changes. Multi-professional team is needed to successful practice change. Partnering between healthcare organizations and state hospital associations proved beneficial in the development and implementation the intervention. Bibliography: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Annual smoking - attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and economic costs - United States, 1995-1999. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly. 2002;51(14):300-303. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5114a2.htm. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State-Specific Smoking-Attributable Mortality and Years of Potential Life Lost—United States, 2000–2004. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2009;58(2):29-33. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5802a2.htm . 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health, United States. Hyattsville (MD): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2009. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm 4. Oklahoma State Department of Health. Fewer Tobacco Users: Oklahoma State Plan for Tobacco Use Prevention & Cessation Oklahoma State Department of Health; 2010. 5. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. Key State-Specific Tobacco-Related Data & Rankings. Fact Sheet 2010. Accessed January 14, 2011. http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0176.pdf. 6. Fiore Mea. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: Evidence Based Clinical Practice Guideline. Rockport, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2008. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectTobaccoen_GB
dc.subjectEducationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:04:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:04:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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