2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203223
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE GROWING A CULTURE OF CLINICAL INQUIRY (GCCI) PROJECT: EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN ACTION
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: The Institute of Medicine has set a goal that by 2020, 90% of all healthcare decisions in the United States will be evidenced based (Olsen, et al., 2007), but the majority of nurses are still not consistently implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) in their clinical settings (Pravikoff, et al., 2005). According to the Health Research Institute (2007), in the absence of EBP, patients may fail to receive the highest quality of care, health outcomes may be seriously jeopardized, and healthcare costs continue to soar. Evidence: When nurses possess a spirit of inquiry within a supportive EBP culture, they are encouraged to ask questions about clinical practice in order to achieve effective and cost efficient care. Furthermore, when nurses implement EBP, the highest quality of care is delivered and the best patient, provider, and system outcomes are achieved (Melnyk and Fine-Overholt, 2005). Strategy/Practice Change: Strategies used in the GCCI project include: PowerPoint presentations, EBP unit champions, clinical question (PICO) boxes, Clinical Inquiry Posters, Summaries of Evidence (SOE), Layman’s SOE, Medical Librarian inservices and Journal Clubs. Evaluation: After a 12 month period, 34 PICO questions and 23 questions from the clinical inquiry poster were submitted by staff. In response to these questions, 26 SOEs and 7 layman’s SOE were disseminated for staff review. Lastly, 19 of 36 staff met with the medical librarian. Results: There is a growing database of PICO questions generated by staff, an active and thriving Journal Club, increased staff comfort and competence in asking relevant questions and formulating PICO questions. Journal Club members are more proficient in performing literature searches and critical appraisal techniques. Recommendations/Lessons Learned: The GCCI project uses validated EBP strategies empowering nurses to ask questions about treatments and care decisions, and to acquire and critically appraise the evidence to support or refute traditional practices. Thus, they can learn how to apply evidence for best practice and assess its effectiveness as it applies to their practice. Bibliography: Health Research Institute, PricewaterhouseCoopers. What works: healing the healthcare staffing shortage. Dallas: PricewaterhouseCoopers; 2007. http://www.pwc.com/us/en/healthcare/publications/what-works-healing-the-healthcare-staffing-shortage.jhtml. Maljanian, R. et al. (2002).Evidence-based nursing practice, Part 2: building skills through research roundtables. Journal of Nursing Administration 32(2), 85-90. Melnyk, B.M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: a guide to best practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Olsen, L., et al. (2007). The learning healthcare system: workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11903 . Pravikoff, D.S., et al. (2005). Evidence-based practice readiness study supported by academy nursing informatics expert panel. Nursing Outlook. 53(1), 49-50. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Clinical; Inquiry
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE GROWING A CULTURE OF CLINICAL INQUIRY (GCCI) PROJECT: EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN ACTIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203223-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: The Institute of Medicine has set a goal that by 2020, 90% of all healthcare decisions in the United States will be evidenced based (Olsen, et al., 2007), but the majority of nurses are still not consistently implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) in their clinical settings (Pravikoff, et al., 2005). According to the Health Research Institute (2007), in the absence of EBP, patients may fail to receive the highest quality of care, health outcomes may be seriously jeopardized, and healthcare costs continue to soar. Evidence: When nurses possess a spirit of inquiry within a supportive EBP culture, they are encouraged to ask questions about clinical practice in order to achieve effective and cost efficient care. Furthermore, when nurses implement EBP, the highest quality of care is delivered and the best patient, provider, and system outcomes are achieved (Melnyk and Fine-Overholt, 2005). Strategy/Practice Change: Strategies used in the GCCI project include: PowerPoint presentations, EBP unit champions, clinical question (PICO) boxes, Clinical Inquiry Posters, Summaries of Evidence (SOE), Layman’s SOE, Medical Librarian inservices and Journal Clubs. Evaluation: After a 12 month period, 34 PICO questions and 23 questions from the clinical inquiry poster were submitted by staff. In response to these questions, 26 SOEs and 7 layman’s SOE were disseminated for staff review. Lastly, 19 of 36 staff met with the medical librarian. Results: There is a growing database of PICO questions generated by staff, an active and thriving Journal Club, increased staff comfort and competence in asking relevant questions and formulating PICO questions. Journal Club members are more proficient in performing literature searches and critical appraisal techniques. Recommendations/Lessons Learned: The GCCI project uses validated EBP strategies empowering nurses to ask questions about treatments and care decisions, and to acquire and critically appraise the evidence to support or refute traditional practices. Thus, they can learn how to apply evidence for best practice and assess its effectiveness as it applies to their practice. Bibliography: Health Research Institute, PricewaterhouseCoopers. What works: healing the healthcare staffing shortage. Dallas: PricewaterhouseCoopers; 2007. http://www.pwc.com/us/en/healthcare/publications/what-works-healing-the-healthcare-staffing-shortage.jhtml. Maljanian, R. et al. (2002).Evidence-based nursing practice, Part 2: building skills through research roundtables. Journal of Nursing Administration 32(2), 85-90. Melnyk, B.M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: a guide to best practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Olsen, L., et al. (2007). The learning healthcare system: workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11903 . Pravikoff, D.S., et al. (2005). Evidence-based practice readiness study supported by academy nursing informatics expert panel. Nursing Outlook. 53(1), 49-50. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectClinicalen_GB
dc.subjectInquiryen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:04:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:04:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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