2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203224
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Evidence-Based Quality Improvement in a New Online DNP Program
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Teaching Doctor of Nursing Practice students how to integrate evidence-based quality improvement programs into their practice in an online program. Evidence: Clinical problems are discovered in practice by examining internal data sources as well as reviewing external literature. Change within an organization should be supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence within an agency. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) information and other systematic data can gauge whether or not benchmarks are being met. Stakeholder involvement from day one is essential to a successful evidence-based quality improvement program (Burke, 2010). The results of clinical studies that have been conducted using scientific inquiry can be supported by evidence from quality improvement projects (Campbell, Braspenning, Hutchinson, & Marshall, 2002). The results of quality improvement projects should not be given the same weight as research (Newhouse et al., 2006). Qualitative research may be more aligned with quality improvement projects, especially when the phenomenon is not well understood. It is important that students know the difference between research and a quality improvement project (Kring, 2008). Evidence based practice can provide solutions which will remove existing barriers to practice improvement. Multi-dimensional approaches are essential to overcoming barriers to success (Solomons, 2011). Successful CQI implementation is associated with stakeholder input, teamwork, and performance feedback (Chou, et. al, 2011). Strategy: Students were given the tools to develop, implement, and evaluate evidence-based clinical and administrative programs in their practice. Practice Change: Students developed an evidence-based quality improvement program in their practice based on an identified needed change. Evaluation: Students were able to synthesize evidence for evaluating program planning frameworks, strategic implementation, and program evaluation to improve healthcare outcomes. Results: Students successfully developed an evidence-based quality improvement program that can be implemented into their practice. Recommendations: Students come to campus to present their projects face-to-face to fellow students and faculty. Lessons learned: Feedback from students indicated a need to change this from an 8-week to a 15-week course. References: Burke, R. (2010). Describing the problem for an evidence-based practice improvement project: A missing ingredient. Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, Vol. 24(3), 2010. Campbell, S. M., Braspenning, J., Hutchinson, A., and Marshall, M. (2002). Research methods used in developing and applying quality indicators in primary care. Quality & Safety in Health Care, 11, 358-364. Chou, A. F., Vaughn, T. E., McCoy, K. D., and Doebbeling, B. N. (2011). Implementation of evidence-based practices: Applying a goal commitment framework. Health Care Management Review., 36(1), 4-17. Kring, D. L. (2008). Research and quality improvement: Different processes, different evidence. MEDSURG Nursing, 17(3), 162-169. Newhouse, R. P., Pettit, J. C., Poe, S., and Rocco, L. (2006). The slippery slope: Differentiating between quality improvement and research. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36, 211- 219. Solomons, N. M., and Spross, J. A. (2011). Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: An integrative review. Journal of Nursing Management, 19(1), 109-20. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Teaching; DNP
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Evidence-Based Quality Improvement in a New Online DNP Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203224-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Teaching Doctor of Nursing Practice students how to integrate evidence-based quality improvement programs into their practice in an online program. Evidence: Clinical problems are discovered in practice by examining internal data sources as well as reviewing external literature. Change within an organization should be supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence within an agency. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) information and other systematic data can gauge whether or not benchmarks are being met. Stakeholder involvement from day one is essential to a successful evidence-based quality improvement program (Burke, 2010). The results of clinical studies that have been conducted using scientific inquiry can be supported by evidence from quality improvement projects (Campbell, Braspenning, Hutchinson, & Marshall, 2002). The results of quality improvement projects should not be given the same weight as research (Newhouse et al., 2006). Qualitative research may be more aligned with quality improvement projects, especially when the phenomenon is not well understood. It is important that students know the difference between research and a quality improvement project (Kring, 2008). Evidence based practice can provide solutions which will remove existing barriers to practice improvement. Multi-dimensional approaches are essential to overcoming barriers to success (Solomons, 2011). Successful CQI implementation is associated with stakeholder input, teamwork, and performance feedback (Chou, et. al, 2011). Strategy: Students were given the tools to develop, implement, and evaluate evidence-based clinical and administrative programs in their practice. Practice Change: Students developed an evidence-based quality improvement program in their practice based on an identified needed change. Evaluation: Students were able to synthesize evidence for evaluating program planning frameworks, strategic implementation, and program evaluation to improve healthcare outcomes. Results: Students successfully developed an evidence-based quality improvement program that can be implemented into their practice. Recommendations: Students come to campus to present their projects face-to-face to fellow students and faculty. Lessons learned: Feedback from students indicated a need to change this from an 8-week to a 15-week course. References: Burke, R. (2010). Describing the problem for an evidence-based practice improvement project: A missing ingredient. Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, Vol. 24(3), 2010. Campbell, S. M., Braspenning, J., Hutchinson, A., and Marshall, M. (2002). Research methods used in developing and applying quality indicators in primary care. Quality & Safety in Health Care, 11, 358-364. Chou, A. F., Vaughn, T. E., McCoy, K. D., and Doebbeling, B. N. (2011). Implementation of evidence-based practices: Applying a goal commitment framework. Health Care Management Review., 36(1), 4-17. Kring, D. L. (2008). Research and quality improvement: Different processes, different evidence. MEDSURG Nursing, 17(3), 162-169. Newhouse, R. P., Pettit, J. C., Poe, S., and Rocco, L. (2006). The slippery slope: Differentiating between quality improvement and research. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36, 211- 219. Solomons, N. M., and Spross, J. A. (2011). Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: An integrative review. Journal of Nursing Management, 19(1), 109-20. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectTeachingen_GB
dc.subjectDNPen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:04:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:04:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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