2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Say Yes: Using Sponsored Trials to Augment Nursing Research in Practice
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Nurses are approached to participate in industry sponsored studies to test new products. Nurses can have an active role in the research team with support. Evidence: Supporting nurses in clinical trials contributes to a culture of inquiry to augment evidence based practice and research development as an example of diffusion of innovation (Rogers, 1995). Diffusion is dependent upon system members, in this case, bedside clinicians, communicating and motivating the uptake of innovation. Strategy: In a large Midwest medical center, we received two requests in consecutive years to participate in industry sponsored nursing clinical trials. For both studies, nurses answered yes to be principal investigators. Participation in these studies created the impetus to develop additional processes to support staff in research while they maintained their clinical role. Practice Change: Collaboration among clinical leadership, nursing research and sponsored programs made participation possible and feasible. Teams developed processes to complete the IRB application, involve stakeholders from the frontline, and track departmental financial reimbursement. Evaluation: Outcomes were evaluated from a research and administrative perspective including primary study endpoints and tracking nursing research time, expenses and reimbursements. Results: Two clinical trials were successfully completed. In the first trial, completed in 2008, 35 nurses were enrolled as research subjects to test peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters in a simulation arm. In the second, completed in 2010, over 300 patients were enrolled in a single site PIV stabilization randomized clinical trial whereby the nurse principal investigator provided study oversight of 12 staff nurses, presented results at two national conferences and served as first author for the research report published in December 2010. Recommendations: Leadership support through mentoring and collaboration is essential for participation and successful completion of sponsored trials. Lessons Learned: Particpation in sponsored trials can be a winning investment. Transparency from the planning stages through data lock and dissemination enables hospital management and the sponsor clear expectations. Bibliography: Rogers, E. M. (1995). Diffusion of innovations. (4th ed.). New York: Free Press. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Trials; Research
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSay Yes: Using Sponsored Trials to Augment Nursing Research in Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203229-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Nurses are approached to participate in industry sponsored studies to test new products. Nurses can have an active role in the research team with support. Evidence: Supporting nurses in clinical trials contributes to a culture of inquiry to augment evidence based practice and research development as an example of diffusion of innovation (Rogers, 1995). Diffusion is dependent upon system members, in this case, bedside clinicians, communicating and motivating the uptake of innovation. Strategy: In a large Midwest medical center, we received two requests in consecutive years to participate in industry sponsored nursing clinical trials. For both studies, nurses answered yes to be principal investigators. Participation in these studies created the impetus to develop additional processes to support staff in research while they maintained their clinical role. Practice Change: Collaboration among clinical leadership, nursing research and sponsored programs made participation possible and feasible. Teams developed processes to complete the IRB application, involve stakeholders from the frontline, and track departmental financial reimbursement. Evaluation: Outcomes were evaluated from a research and administrative perspective including primary study endpoints and tracking nursing research time, expenses and reimbursements. Results: Two clinical trials were successfully completed. In the first trial, completed in 2008, 35 nurses were enrolled as research subjects to test peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters in a simulation arm. In the second, completed in 2010, over 300 patients were enrolled in a single site PIV stabilization randomized clinical trial whereby the nurse principal investigator provided study oversight of 12 staff nurses, presented results at two national conferences and served as first author for the research report published in December 2010. Recommendations: Leadership support through mentoring and collaboration is essential for participation and successful completion of sponsored trials. Lessons Learned: Particpation in sponsored trials can be a winning investment. Transparency from the planning stages through data lock and dissemination enables hospital management and the sponsor clear expectations. Bibliography: Rogers, E. M. (1995). Diffusion of innovations. (4th ed.). New York: Free Press. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectTrialsen_GB
dc.subjectResearchen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:04:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:04:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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