2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203238
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Safety and Shift Report: A Strategy for Effective Communication
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem (Problem and Change Needed): A review of 27 charts determined that 14 patient profiles, 52% of our census, contained inaccurate documentation. Erroneous documentation included: Social security numbers, Diagnosis, Diet, Activity restrictions, BGM orders. 100% of the charts omitted patient information required by The Joint Commission for safe and effective care. Evidence (Appraise the supporting evidence): The Joint Commission has identified miscommunication as the most common cause of patient injury or death and the need to improve the effectiveness of communication among caregivers as National Patient Safety Goal Number Two. “Accurate and consistent patient centered communication, is associated with improved patient outcomes such as (a) improved patient satisfaction, (b) increased adherence to treatment plans, and (c) improved patient health (Charlton, Dearing, Berry, & Johnson, 2008)”. This change in practice attempts to provide both patients and fellow staff members with accurate, patient centered communication in an effort to achieve positive patient outcomes. Strategy (Linking the change to the evidence): The purpose of this change in practice is to facilitate and improve the transfer of patient information between tours of duty with the introduction of a comprehensive, standardized ‘Communication Report Sheet (CRS)’ in an Excel document and to eliminate time consuming and repetitive documentation. Practice Change (Specific change or practice evaluated): The CRS is an Excel document that allows the transfer of data from single point (one point) of entry to all other required forms. Critical patient information is entered in the CRS Tab, triggering the automatic update of corresponding Vital Sign, BGM, ADL, Treatment and Ward Census forms, requiring the RN to enter data only once. • The CRS was approved by the 2A Professional Practice Council on February 9th, 2010 and subsequent revisions were implemented per staff input. • 2A staff was in-serviced on CRS use and editing. • A 2A CRS Instruction Manual was developed as a reference tool. • Data from individual chart reviews and patient and staff satisfaction surveys were utilized to determine effectiveness. Evaluation (Design and Indicators/outcomes measured): • Patient Satisfaction surveys indicate improved patient satisfaction. • Data collected from individual chart reviews indicate patient specific documentation error at only 8%. • Staff Satisfaction surveys indicate both licensed and unlicensed personnel feel they are able to provide safer and more effective care. Results (Did it work?): • Diagnosis and current condition of a patient, recent and anticipated changes in condition or treatment and what to anticipate in the next interval of care can be easily identified by all staff members in accordance with Joint Commission’s guidelines for standards of care. • Utilization of the CRS has decreases the length of time to give/receive hand off report, increasing patient safety and staff availability on the unit, has proven to be a user friendly standardized data template, saving valuable time and reducing errors in transcription, has eliminated subjective entry of patient information and has increased our patient’s ability to participate more effectively in their plan of care. • Another unit has now adopted the CRS and its implementation facility wide is expected in 2011. Recommendations (Further adoption suggestions): The CRS is the subject of constant evaluation. A second version will be implemented in February of 2010 based on staff input and Joint Commission standards of care. The VA’s research department is assisting in the development of a more comprehensive and formalized system of review and data collection in an effort to identify need for improvement and provide EBP. Lessons Learned: The most significant barrier this change in practice faced was staff reluctance to embrace change and the varying degrees of computer literacy on 2A. The importance of staff support for the project was recognized and intensive education was provided both verbally and an instruction manual was developed to facilitate use. The availability of our team to reinforce education was a key component to this project’s success. The promotion of the CRS as a collaborative unit effort has been achieved by incorporating staff suggestions into a revised version of the CRS, available in February, 2011. Bibliography: Calalang-Javier, H. V. (2009). Effective Communication and Patient Safety . Retrieved March 6, 2010, from BellaOnline: http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art46170.asp Charlton, C. R., Dearing, K. S., Berry, J. A., & Johnson, M. J. (2008). Nurse practitioners' communication styles and their impact on patient outcomes: An integrated literature review. Journal of the Acadamy of Nurse Practitoners , 382-388. Churchill, W. (2010). Creative Quotes and Quotations on Change. Retrieved March 11, 2010, from Creating Minds.org: http://creatingminds.org/quotes/change.htm Grossman, S. .., & Valiga, T. M. (2009). The New Leadership Challenge Creating the Future of Nursing. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis, Company. Hand-off communications. (2008, December 9). Retrieved March 6, 2010, from The Joint Commisssion: http://www.jointcommission.org/AccreditationPrograms/LongTermCare/Standards/09_FAQs/NPSG/Communication/NPSG.02.05.01/hand_off_communications.htm LiveData Inc. (2010, March). Patient Safety: The Joint Commission. Retrieved March 19, 2010, from LiveData: http://www.livedata.com/content/view/56/48/ Lyer, P. (2010). Articles: Medical Errors SBAR. Retrieved March 6, 2010, from Med League: http://www.medleague.com/Articles/medical_errors/sbar. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Strategy; Communication
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Safety and Shift Report: A Strategy for Effective Communicationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203238-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem (Problem and Change Needed): A review of 27 charts determined that 14 patient profiles, 52% of our census, contained inaccurate documentation. Erroneous documentation included: Social security numbers, Diagnosis, Diet, Activity restrictions, BGM orders. 100% of the charts omitted patient information required by The Joint Commission for safe and effective care. Evidence (Appraise the supporting evidence): The Joint Commission has identified miscommunication as the most common cause of patient injury or death and the need to improve the effectiveness of communication among caregivers as National Patient Safety Goal Number Two. “Accurate and consistent patient centered communication, is associated with improved patient outcomes such as (a) improved patient satisfaction, (b) increased adherence to treatment plans, and (c) improved patient health (Charlton, Dearing, Berry, & Johnson, 2008)”. This change in practice attempts to provide both patients and fellow staff members with accurate, patient centered communication in an effort to achieve positive patient outcomes. Strategy (Linking the change to the evidence): The purpose of this change in practice is to facilitate and improve the transfer of patient information between tours of duty with the introduction of a comprehensive, standardized ‘Communication Report Sheet (CRS)’ in an Excel document and to eliminate time consuming and repetitive documentation. Practice Change (Specific change or practice evaluated): The CRS is an Excel document that allows the transfer of data from single point (one point) of entry to all other required forms. Critical patient information is entered in the CRS Tab, triggering the automatic update of corresponding Vital Sign, BGM, ADL, Treatment and Ward Census forms, requiring the RN to enter data only once. • The CRS was approved by the 2A Professional Practice Council on February 9th, 2010 and subsequent revisions were implemented per staff input. • 2A staff was in-serviced on CRS use and editing. • A 2A CRS Instruction Manual was developed as a reference tool. • Data from individual chart reviews and patient and staff satisfaction surveys were utilized to determine effectiveness. Evaluation (Design and Indicators/outcomes measured): • Patient Satisfaction surveys indicate improved patient satisfaction. • Data collected from individual chart reviews indicate patient specific documentation error at only 8%. • Staff Satisfaction surveys indicate both licensed and unlicensed personnel feel they are able to provide safer and more effective care. Results (Did it work?): • Diagnosis and current condition of a patient, recent and anticipated changes in condition or treatment and what to anticipate in the next interval of care can be easily identified by all staff members in accordance with Joint Commission’s guidelines for standards of care. • Utilization of the CRS has decreases the length of time to give/receive hand off report, increasing patient safety and staff availability on the unit, has proven to be a user friendly standardized data template, saving valuable time and reducing errors in transcription, has eliminated subjective entry of patient information and has increased our patient’s ability to participate more effectively in their plan of care. • Another unit has now adopted the CRS and its implementation facility wide is expected in 2011. Recommendations (Further adoption suggestions): The CRS is the subject of constant evaluation. A second version will be implemented in February of 2010 based on staff input and Joint Commission standards of care. The VA’s research department is assisting in the development of a more comprehensive and formalized system of review and data collection in an effort to identify need for improvement and provide EBP. Lessons Learned: The most significant barrier this change in practice faced was staff reluctance to embrace change and the varying degrees of computer literacy on 2A. The importance of staff support for the project was recognized and intensive education was provided both verbally and an instruction manual was developed to facilitate use. The availability of our team to reinforce education was a key component to this project’s success. The promotion of the CRS as a collaborative unit effort has been achieved by incorporating staff suggestions into a revised version of the CRS, available in February, 2011. Bibliography: Calalang-Javier, H. V. (2009). Effective Communication and Patient Safety . Retrieved March 6, 2010, from BellaOnline: http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art46170.asp Charlton, C. R., Dearing, K. S., Berry, J. A., & Johnson, M. J. (2008). Nurse practitioners' communication styles and their impact on patient outcomes: An integrated literature review. Journal of the Acadamy of Nurse Practitoners , 382-388. Churchill, W. (2010). Creative Quotes and Quotations on Change. Retrieved March 11, 2010, from Creating Minds.org: http://creatingminds.org/quotes/change.htm Grossman, S. .., & Valiga, T. M. (2009). The New Leadership Challenge Creating the Future of Nursing. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis, Company. Hand-off communications. (2008, December 9). Retrieved March 6, 2010, from The Joint Commisssion: http://www.jointcommission.org/AccreditationPrograms/LongTermCare/Standards/09_FAQs/NPSG/Communication/NPSG.02.05.01/hand_off_communications.htm LiveData Inc. (2010, March). Patient Safety: The Joint Commission. Retrieved March 19, 2010, from LiveData: http://www.livedata.com/content/view/56/48/ Lyer, P. (2010). Articles: Medical Errors SBAR. Retrieved March 6, 2010, from Med League: http://www.medleague.com/Articles/medical_errors/sbar. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectStrategyen_GB
dc.subjectCommunicationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:05:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:05:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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