2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203246
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ICU Nurses’ Readiness to Discuss Palliative Care
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Many nurses are not ready to discuss palliative care issues based on a lack of knowledge, support and experience. Patients and families, therefore, lack the necessary support for facilitating decision-making regarding palliative care in the acute care setting. Evidence: Much has been written about patient perceptions of death and palliative care, however little information exists about the impact of nurses’ attitudes and perceptions on palliative care discussions. Despite the Self Determination Act of 1990, little education on palliative care decision-making occurs with elderly patients. More than 75% of adults over age 65 will suffer from at least one chronic condition between the years 2005-2030, yet co-morbidities and recurrent hospitalizations are not necessarily considered when determining the aggressiveness of ICU care1. Nurses often coordinate communication between the physician and patient’s family; however clarity is lacking regarding the responsibility for educating geriatric patients on advanced life choices. Since only 3% of nursing schools offer end-of- life curricula2, nurses may not have received the training or experience to provide effective end-of-life care. Strategy: Pre-intervention survey; Gained permission to use copyrighted online continuing education (CE) presentation, “Providing Excellent Palliative Care”; Distributed online CE presentation to select units; Post-intervention survey; Findings summarized. Practice Change: Project findings presented to hospital Palliative Care team; CE offering distributed hospital-wide. Evaluation: Project effectiveness was measured by comparing pre and post-implementation data. Results: Despite a low response rate on the post-education survey, findings clearly suggest the need for further general and hospital-specific palliative care education. Nurses consistently identified key barriers to initiating a palliative care consultation. Greater than 90% of respondents requested palliative care training. Recommendations: Provide additional interdisciplinary education; Evaluate hospital-specific consultation process. Lessons Learned: Collaboration with key stakeholders is critical to project success. The effectiveness of project is compromised by survey burden among staff nurse participants. Bibliography: Fact Sheet, Institute of Medicine, 2008 Bushinski, R.L. (2007). Practices of effective end-of-life communication between nurses and patients/families in two care settings. Creative Nursing. 13(3), 9-12. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
ICU; Palliative Care
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleICU Nurses’ Readiness to Discuss Palliative Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203246-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Many nurses are not ready to discuss palliative care issues based on a lack of knowledge, support and experience. Patients and families, therefore, lack the necessary support for facilitating decision-making regarding palliative care in the acute care setting. Evidence: Much has been written about patient perceptions of death and palliative care, however little information exists about the impact of nurses’ attitudes and perceptions on palliative care discussions. Despite the Self Determination Act of 1990, little education on palliative care decision-making occurs with elderly patients. More than 75% of adults over age 65 will suffer from at least one chronic condition between the years 2005-2030, yet co-morbidities and recurrent hospitalizations are not necessarily considered when determining the aggressiveness of ICU care1. Nurses often coordinate communication between the physician and patient’s family; however clarity is lacking regarding the responsibility for educating geriatric patients on advanced life choices. Since only 3% of nursing schools offer end-of- life curricula2, nurses may not have received the training or experience to provide effective end-of-life care. Strategy: Pre-intervention survey; Gained permission to use copyrighted online continuing education (CE) presentation, “Providing Excellent Palliative Care”; Distributed online CE presentation to select units; Post-intervention survey; Findings summarized. Practice Change: Project findings presented to hospital Palliative Care team; CE offering distributed hospital-wide. Evaluation: Project effectiveness was measured by comparing pre and post-implementation data. Results: Despite a low response rate on the post-education survey, findings clearly suggest the need for further general and hospital-specific palliative care education. Nurses consistently identified key barriers to initiating a palliative care consultation. Greater than 90% of respondents requested palliative care training. Recommendations: Provide additional interdisciplinary education; Evaluate hospital-specific consultation process. Lessons Learned: Collaboration with key stakeholders is critical to project success. The effectiveness of project is compromised by survey burden among staff nurse participants. Bibliography: Fact Sheet, Institute of Medicine, 2008 Bushinski, R.L. (2007). Practices of effective end-of-life communication between nurses and patients/families in two care settings. Creative Nursing. 13(3), 9-12. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectICUen_GB
dc.subjectPalliative Careen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:05:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:05:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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