2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203249
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Burnout: The Cost of Caring
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Objectives: 1. Define and distinguish burnout and stress. 2. List primary sources of job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout among nurses. 3. Describe the personal and professional consequences of nursing burnout and its effect on patient outcomes. 4. Describe both personal strategies to manage stress and prevent burnout and strategies that institutions should implement to help prevent work-related stress and burnout among nurses. Problem: Sixty percent of all nurses are employed in hospital settings. Increasing demands on nursing professionals require nurses to maintain competencies in a multitude of healthcare settings especially with increasing technological advances in healthcare. Despite great opportunities in the Nursing Profession, it is difficult for facilities to recruit and retain nursing professionals. Related stressors and demands in the nursing profession are identified by nurses as factors that increase depression, anxiety, and stress. Evidence: In a poll on stress, depression, and anxiety, 4.11% of nurses polled identified that administration is as supportive to nurses with depression, anxiety, and stress as with other diseases and 70.06% identified that stress, depression, and anxiety are higher in the nursing profession than any other healthcare profession. Strategy: Identified causes of stress in the nursing profession are prominent in intensive care and emergency care settings and surprisingly for new graduate nurses. It is vital for the nursing profession to identify strategies to decrease stress, depression, and anxiety in the work setting, to develop and implement strategies to decrease stress and burnout, to improve nursing moral, decrease anxiety and depression in the nursing profession, increase retention of nursing professionals, and promote nursing as a highly desired and rewarding profession. Practice Change: Improve the quality of nursing mentorship for new nursing staff to promote a positive nursing culture and improve nursing retention. Evaluation: Evaluations from nursing staff are a key element to identifying needs of nursing staff and effectiveness of orientation or mentorship programs with seasoned nurses. Promoting a healthy nursing work environment increases nursing satisfaction, decreases stress and anxiety, and promotes the nursing profession. Results: Improving mentorship and orientation programs promotes increased confidence in new nursing staff, builds staff cohesiveness, decreases stress / anxiety / depression in the work environment, and promotes a healthy nursing culture. Recommendations: Develop leadership qualities in seasoned nursing staff to promote a healthy work environment and continue to identify and address nursing concerns in a positive environment to promote the nursing profession. Lessons Learned: Identifying seasoned nursing staff with excellent nursing skills in leadership qualities will improve orientation and mentorship experiences for new nursing staff to help prepare new nurses to function in the work environment and maintain a positive nursing culture. Bibliography: American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) (2010). The secret caregivers. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/relationships/caregiving/info-04-2010/the-secret-caregivers.html ALLNURSES.COM, (2010). Nursing & Depression. Retrieved from http://allnurses.com/general-nursing-discussion/nursing-and-depression-21324.html Borkowski, N. (2005). Organizational behavior in health care. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. Ben-Zur, H. & Michael, K. (2007). Burnout, social support, and coping at work among social workers, psychologists, and nurses: The role of challenge/control appraisals. Social Work in Health Care, 45(4), p. 63-82. Retrieved from Master FILE Premier. Burnout in Health Professionals. (2007). In Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine. Retrieved from: http://www.credoreference.com/entry/cupphm/burnout_in_health_professionals Bureau of Labor Statistics (2010). Occupational outlook handbook, 2010-11 edition. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm Chang, E.M., Hancock, K.M., Johnson, A., Daly, J. & Jackson, D. (2005). Role stress in nurses: Review of related factors and strategies for moving forward. Nursing and Health Sciences, 7, 57-65. Ericson-Lidman, E., & Strandberg, G. (2007). Burnout: Co-workers’ perceptions of signs preceding workmates’ burnout. The authors. Journal compilation @ 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, p. 199-208. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Fotosearch.com (2010). Nursing healthcare provider. Retrieved from http://www.fotosearch.com/photo- images/health-care.html. Frandsen, B. M. (May 2010). Burnout or compassion fatigue? Long Term Living for the Continuing Care Processional, p. 50-52. Retrieved from http://www.ltlmagazine.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid. Garrett, C. (2008). The effect of nurse staffing patterns on medical errors and nurse burnout. AORN Journal, 87(6), p. 1191-1204. Retrieved from MEDLINE with Full Text. HelpGuide.org (2009). Preventing burnout. Understand, Prevent, and Resolve Life's Challenges. Retrieved from www.helpguide.org/mental/burnout_signs_symptoms.htm. Healthy LifeStyles, (2010). Enjoy your life again before it’s too late. Retrieved from http://www.everydaylifestyles.com/mood.php?t202id=83867&t202kw=abld_2a_1a_m2 Hertel, R. (May/June2009). Burnout and the Med-Surg Nurse. Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, 18(3), 16-19. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Kennedy, B.R. (2007). Preventing stress and burnout of nursing staff in LTC. (Long Term Care). Long-Term Care Interface, p 38(5). Laal, M. & Aliramaie, N. (2010). Nursing and coping with stress. International Journal of Collaborative Research on Internal Medicine & Public Health. Leiter, M.P., & Maslach, C. (2009). Nurse turnover: The mediating role of burnout. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, p. 331-339. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Mills, J., & Aubeeluck, A. (2006). Nurses' experiences of caring for their own family members. British Journal of Nursing, 15(3), 160-165. National Family Caregivers Association (2010). Who are America’s family caregivers? Retrieved from http://www.nfcacares.org/who_are_family_caregivers/ Patrick, K. (2007). Burnout in nursing. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24(3), p. 43-48. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Burnout; Caring
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Burnout: The Cost of Caringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203249-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Objectives: 1. Define and distinguish burnout and stress. 2. List primary sources of job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout among nurses. 3. Describe the personal and professional consequences of nursing burnout and its effect on patient outcomes. 4. Describe both personal strategies to manage stress and prevent burnout and strategies that institutions should implement to help prevent work-related stress and burnout among nurses. Problem: Sixty percent of all nurses are employed in hospital settings. Increasing demands on nursing professionals require nurses to maintain competencies in a multitude of healthcare settings especially with increasing technological advances in healthcare. Despite great opportunities in the Nursing Profession, it is difficult for facilities to recruit and retain nursing professionals. Related stressors and demands in the nursing profession are identified by nurses as factors that increase depression, anxiety, and stress. Evidence: In a poll on stress, depression, and anxiety, 4.11% of nurses polled identified that administration is as supportive to nurses with depression, anxiety, and stress as with other diseases and 70.06% identified that stress, depression, and anxiety are higher in the nursing profession than any other healthcare profession. Strategy: Identified causes of stress in the nursing profession are prominent in intensive care and emergency care settings and surprisingly for new graduate nurses. It is vital for the nursing profession to identify strategies to decrease stress, depression, and anxiety in the work setting, to develop and implement strategies to decrease stress and burnout, to improve nursing moral, decrease anxiety and depression in the nursing profession, increase retention of nursing professionals, and promote nursing as a highly desired and rewarding profession. Practice Change: Improve the quality of nursing mentorship for new nursing staff to promote a positive nursing culture and improve nursing retention. Evaluation: Evaluations from nursing staff are a key element to identifying needs of nursing staff and effectiveness of orientation or mentorship programs with seasoned nurses. Promoting a healthy nursing work environment increases nursing satisfaction, decreases stress and anxiety, and promotes the nursing profession. Results: Improving mentorship and orientation programs promotes increased confidence in new nursing staff, builds staff cohesiveness, decreases stress / anxiety / depression in the work environment, and promotes a healthy nursing culture. Recommendations: Develop leadership qualities in seasoned nursing staff to promote a healthy work environment and continue to identify and address nursing concerns in a positive environment to promote the nursing profession. Lessons Learned: Identifying seasoned nursing staff with excellent nursing skills in leadership qualities will improve orientation and mentorship experiences for new nursing staff to help prepare new nurses to function in the work environment and maintain a positive nursing culture. Bibliography: American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) (2010). The secret caregivers. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/relationships/caregiving/info-04-2010/the-secret-caregivers.html ALLNURSES.COM, (2010). Nursing & Depression. Retrieved from http://allnurses.com/general-nursing-discussion/nursing-and-depression-21324.html Borkowski, N. (2005). Organizational behavior in health care. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. Ben-Zur, H. & Michael, K. (2007). Burnout, social support, and coping at work among social workers, psychologists, and nurses: The role of challenge/control appraisals. Social Work in Health Care, 45(4), p. 63-82. Retrieved from Master FILE Premier. Burnout in Health Professionals. (2007). In Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine. Retrieved from: http://www.credoreference.com/entry/cupphm/burnout_in_health_professionals Bureau of Labor Statistics (2010). Occupational outlook handbook, 2010-11 edition. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm Chang, E.M., Hancock, K.M., Johnson, A., Daly, J. & Jackson, D. (2005). Role stress in nurses: Review of related factors and strategies for moving forward. Nursing and Health Sciences, 7, 57-65. Ericson-Lidman, E., & Strandberg, G. (2007). Burnout: Co-workers’ perceptions of signs preceding workmates’ burnout. The authors. Journal compilation @ 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, p. 199-208. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Fotosearch.com (2010). Nursing healthcare provider. Retrieved from http://www.fotosearch.com/photo- images/health-care.html. Frandsen, B. M. (May 2010). Burnout or compassion fatigue? Long Term Living for the Continuing Care Processional, p. 50-52. Retrieved from http://www.ltlmagazine.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid. Garrett, C. (2008). The effect of nurse staffing patterns on medical errors and nurse burnout. AORN Journal, 87(6), p. 1191-1204. Retrieved from MEDLINE with Full Text. HelpGuide.org (2009). Preventing burnout. Understand, Prevent, and Resolve Life's Challenges. Retrieved from www.helpguide.org/mental/burnout_signs_symptoms.htm. Healthy LifeStyles, (2010). Enjoy your life again before it’s too late. Retrieved from http://www.everydaylifestyles.com/mood.php?t202id=83867&t202kw=abld_2a_1a_m2 Hertel, R. (May/June2009). Burnout and the Med-Surg Nurse. Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, 18(3), 16-19. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Kennedy, B.R. (2007). Preventing stress and burnout of nursing staff in LTC. (Long Term Care). Long-Term Care Interface, p 38(5). Laal, M. & Aliramaie, N. (2010). Nursing and coping with stress. International Journal of Collaborative Research on Internal Medicine & Public Health. Leiter, M.P., & Maslach, C. (2009). Nurse turnover: The mediating role of burnout. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, p. 331-339. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Mills, J., & Aubeeluck, A. (2006). Nurses' experiences of caring for their own family members. British Journal of Nursing, 15(3), 160-165. National Family Caregivers Association (2010). Who are America’s family caregivers? Retrieved from http://www.nfcacares.org/who_are_family_caregivers/ Patrick, K. (2007). Burnout in nursing. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24(3), p. 43-48. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectBurnouten_GB
dc.subjectCaringen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:05:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:05:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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