12.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203250
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Rehabilitation: Spasticity and the Baclofen Pump
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Objectives: Learning Objective 1: After participating in the session, the attendee will be able to describe the effects of patient spasms in the rehabilitation process. Learning Objective 2: After attending the session, the audience will be able to list 6 advantages to having a baclofen pump placed to control spasms which will improve the rehabilitation experience, outcomes, and quality of life. Learning Objective 3: After participating in the session, the attendee will be able to recognize critical indicators in maintaining a baclofen pump, preventing complications and identifying risk factors associated with a baclofen pump. Problem: Spasms prevent a patient's advancement in the rehabilitation process due to uncontrollable pain, pressure ulcers, and increased risk for falls. Evidence: The prevalence of pressure sores in hospitalized patients has been reported to be from 14-21% over the last decade. Spasticity often contributes to ulcer formation by repeatedly exposing tissues to trauma through repeated friction and shear forces. Baclofen pump implantation maintains a constant supply of medication to prevent complications with spasticity and reduces friction and shear forces with minimal side effects from medication. Strategy: Strategies to maintain control of spasms includes oral medications, such as: baclofen, tizanidine, and gabapentin. The Baclofen Pump is increasingly being offered to patients who suffer from complications with spasms due to a SCI and decreases the risk for medication side effects. Practice Change: The baclofen pump improves therapeutic outcomes for pain control, prevention of pressure ulcer, safety for the ambulating patient, and satisfaction for the SCI patient population who suffer from complications with uncontrollable spasms. Evaluation: Review of literature with the use of the baclofen pump for control of spasms and increasing function identify improved outcomes in ambulation, decreased pain and improved pain control, decreased risk for pressure ulcer development, and improved quality of life. Results: Educating and familiarizing nursing with the use of advanced technology in therapy within the rehabilitation process will promote a greater understanding for the use of new advanced technology to improve rehabilitation. Recommendations: The baclofen pump is used to improve ambulation for individuals with incomplete spinal cord injuries, decrease the risk of developing pressure ulcers for individuals with complete spinal cord injuries, and maintain the control of pain due to uncontrollable spasms caused by a spinal cord injury. Lessons Learned: The baclofen pump implant is an effective advancement in technology to facilitate improvement in the quality of rehabilitation, functional outcomes, and patient satisfaction of the rehabilitation process for individuals who suffer with severe spasms due to illness or injury. Bibliography: Kirman, C.N. & Molnar, J.A. (2010). Pressure Ulcers, Nonsurgical Treatment and Principles. Retrieved December 17, 2010 from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1293614-overview. Medline Plus (2010). Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms. Retrieved December 17, 2010 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000063.htm. Medtronic (2008). ITB Therapy (Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy), For the management of severe spasticity. Minneapolis, MN. Medtronic (2010). Severe Spasticity: Take Charge Learn About Your Condition. Retrieved December 17, 2010 from http://www.medtronic.com/your-health/severe-spasticity/about/index.htm. Medtronic (2010). Spasticity Management. PMC: Patient Management Coordinator. Memphis, TN. November 12-13, 2010. Medtronic (2010). SynchroMed II Infusion System. Programming Reference Guide. Minneapolis, MN. University of Rochester Medical Center (2010). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Baclofen (Spasticity) Clinic. What is a Baclofen Pump? Retrieved December 17. 2010 from http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/pmr/patients-families/specialty-clinics/baclofen-spasticity.cfm. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Rehabilitation; Pump
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Rehabilitation: Spasticity and the Baclofen Pumpen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203250-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Objectives: Learning Objective 1: After participating in the session, the attendee will be able to describe the effects of patient spasms in the rehabilitation process. Learning Objective 2: After attending the session, the audience will be able to list 6 advantages to having a baclofen pump placed to control spasms which will improve the rehabilitation experience, outcomes, and quality of life. Learning Objective 3: After participating in the session, the attendee will be able to recognize critical indicators in maintaining a baclofen pump, preventing complications and identifying risk factors associated with a baclofen pump. Problem: Spasms prevent a patient's advancement in the rehabilitation process due to uncontrollable pain, pressure ulcers, and increased risk for falls. Evidence: The prevalence of pressure sores in hospitalized patients has been reported to be from 14-21% over the last decade. Spasticity often contributes to ulcer formation by repeatedly exposing tissues to trauma through repeated friction and shear forces. Baclofen pump implantation maintains a constant supply of medication to prevent complications with spasticity and reduces friction and shear forces with minimal side effects from medication. Strategy: Strategies to maintain control of spasms includes oral medications, such as: baclofen, tizanidine, and gabapentin. The Baclofen Pump is increasingly being offered to patients who suffer from complications with spasms due to a SCI and decreases the risk for medication side effects. Practice Change: The baclofen pump improves therapeutic outcomes for pain control, prevention of pressure ulcer, safety for the ambulating patient, and satisfaction for the SCI patient population who suffer from complications with uncontrollable spasms. Evaluation: Review of literature with the use of the baclofen pump for control of spasms and increasing function identify improved outcomes in ambulation, decreased pain and improved pain control, decreased risk for pressure ulcer development, and improved quality of life. Results: Educating and familiarizing nursing with the use of advanced technology in therapy within the rehabilitation process will promote a greater understanding for the use of new advanced technology to improve rehabilitation. Recommendations: The baclofen pump is used to improve ambulation for individuals with incomplete spinal cord injuries, decrease the risk of developing pressure ulcers for individuals with complete spinal cord injuries, and maintain the control of pain due to uncontrollable spasms caused by a spinal cord injury. Lessons Learned: The baclofen pump implant is an effective advancement in technology to facilitate improvement in the quality of rehabilitation, functional outcomes, and patient satisfaction of the rehabilitation process for individuals who suffer with severe spasms due to illness or injury. Bibliography: Kirman, C.N. & Molnar, J.A. (2010). Pressure Ulcers, Nonsurgical Treatment and Principles. Retrieved December 17, 2010 from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1293614-overview. Medline Plus (2010). Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms. Retrieved December 17, 2010 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000063.htm. Medtronic (2008). ITB Therapy (Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy), For the management of severe spasticity. Minneapolis, MN. Medtronic (2010). Severe Spasticity: Take Charge Learn About Your Condition. Retrieved December 17, 2010 from http://www.medtronic.com/your-health/severe-spasticity/about/index.htm. Medtronic (2010). Spasticity Management. PMC: Patient Management Coordinator. Memphis, TN. November 12-13, 2010. Medtronic (2010). SynchroMed II Infusion System. Programming Reference Guide. Minneapolis, MN. University of Rochester Medical Center (2010). Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Baclofen (Spasticity) Clinic. What is a Baclofen Pump? Retrieved December 17. 2010 from http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/pmr/patients-families/specialty-clinics/baclofen-spasticity.cfm. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_GB
dc.subjectPumpen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:05:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:05:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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