2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203254
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Virtual Journal Clubs Improve Critical Appraisal Skill Acquisition
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Common barriers to traditional nursing journal clubs (NJCs) include getting sufficient participation due to time constraints and availability of experienced facilitators. Evidence: An integrative review of ten research articles supports the benefit of NJCs in improving critical appraisal skill acquisition and fosters the dissemination of research findings. Strategy: Technological advances such as the Internet to access virtual environments, provides low-cost venues to engage nurses and mitigate barriers associated with face-to-face meetings. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to describe the experience of using a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE) to facilitate NJCs. Practice Change: Thirty-seven registered nurses/8 facilities were consented to participate in mentored NJC activities in one of four specialty groups (adult, critical care, neonatal, psychiatric). Each group participated in four sessions: orientation, 2 sessions of critiquing research literature using a toolkit, and debriefing/planning for NJC sustainability. Experts with competencies in critiquing literature facilitated all sessions. Evaluation: Nonparametric statistics were used to analyze project outcomes using pre-, post-, and 30-day follow-up surveys. Pre- and post-surveys (35-items) measured self-reported levels of confidence (10-point scale) addressing MUVE and critiquing skills. Content analysis from audio-video screen castings (>20 hrs) of NJC activities were analyzed for themes using NVivo8. Results: Findings from 33/37 participants include: Fisher’s Exact identified significantly (p <.05) improved competencies in determining design, interpreting statistics, linking conclusions/findings, and identifying limitations after the NJCs. No differences were identified in determining population, sample, implications, or interpreting qualitative findings. Quantitative analysis revealed that participants: perceived improved competencies in critiquing research articles during the MUVE-facilitated NJCs and expressed a desire to continue virtual NJCs beyond the study. Qualitative analysis revealed that participants identified with their avatars’, and validated quantitative findings supporting progressive critical appraisal skill acquisition. Recommendations: MUVE-facilitated journal clubs should be expanded to other disciplines and methods to sustain participation explored. Lessons Learned: Lack of skills using innovative technology was easily overcome: however, minimum computer system requirements were critical to participation. Bibliography: Puterbaugh, M., Shannon, M., & Gorton, H. (2010). A survey of nurses' attitudes toward distance education and the educational use of 3-D virtual environments. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, 7(4), 292-307. Rogers, J. (2009). Transferring research into practice: An integrative review. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 23(4), 192-199. Wiecha, J., Heyden, R., Sternthal, E., & Merialdi, M. (2010). Learning in a virtual world: Experience with using Second Life for medical education. Journal of Medical /Internet Research, 12(1), e1. Witmer, B. G. & Singer, M. J. (1998). Measuring presence in virtual environments: A presence questionnaire. Presence, 7(3), 225-240. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Virtual; Appraisal
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVirtual Journal Clubs Improve Critical Appraisal Skill Acquisitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203254-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Common barriers to traditional nursing journal clubs (NJCs) include getting sufficient participation due to time constraints and availability of experienced facilitators. Evidence: An integrative review of ten research articles supports the benefit of NJCs in improving critical appraisal skill acquisition and fosters the dissemination of research findings. Strategy: Technological advances such as the Internet to access virtual environments, provides low-cost venues to engage nurses and mitigate barriers associated with face-to-face meetings. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to describe the experience of using a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE) to facilitate NJCs. Practice Change: Thirty-seven registered nurses/8 facilities were consented to participate in mentored NJC activities in one of four specialty groups (adult, critical care, neonatal, psychiatric). Each group participated in four sessions: orientation, 2 sessions of critiquing research literature using a toolkit, and debriefing/planning for NJC sustainability. Experts with competencies in critiquing literature facilitated all sessions. Evaluation: Nonparametric statistics were used to analyze project outcomes using pre-, post-, and 30-day follow-up surveys. Pre- and post-surveys (35-items) measured self-reported levels of confidence (10-point scale) addressing MUVE and critiquing skills. Content analysis from audio-video screen castings (>20 hrs) of NJC activities were analyzed for themes using NVivo8. Results: Findings from 33/37 participants include: Fisher’s Exact identified significantly (p <.05) improved competencies in determining design, interpreting statistics, linking conclusions/findings, and identifying limitations after the NJCs. No differences were identified in determining population, sample, implications, or interpreting qualitative findings. Quantitative analysis revealed that participants: perceived improved competencies in critiquing research articles during the MUVE-facilitated NJCs and expressed a desire to continue virtual NJCs beyond the study. Qualitative analysis revealed that participants identified with their avatars’, and validated quantitative findings supporting progressive critical appraisal skill acquisition. Recommendations: MUVE-facilitated journal clubs should be expanded to other disciplines and methods to sustain participation explored. Lessons Learned: Lack of skills using innovative technology was easily overcome: however, minimum computer system requirements were critical to participation. Bibliography: Puterbaugh, M., Shannon, M., & Gorton, H. (2010). A survey of nurses' attitudes toward distance education and the educational use of 3-D virtual environments. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, 7(4), 292-307. Rogers, J. (2009). Transferring research into practice: An integrative review. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 23(4), 192-199. Wiecha, J., Heyden, R., Sternthal, E., & Merialdi, M. (2010). Learning in a virtual world: Experience with using Second Life for medical education. Journal of Medical /Internet Research, 12(1), e1. Witmer, B. G. & Singer, M. J. (1998). Measuring presence in virtual environments: A presence questionnaire. Presence, 7(3), 225-240. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectVirtualen_GB
dc.subjectAppraisalen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:06:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:06:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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