2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203257
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of an Evidence Based Journal Club in a 98 Bed Hospital
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Evidence Based Practice (EBP) at the bedside has had limited implementation even though it is widely accepted that such practice improves nursing care (Gale, 2009). Evidence: Available evidence indicates that nurses may feel overwhelmed and may lack skill in locating and interpreting current research findings. It is also clear that organizational support is crucial to change this culture. Strategy: Development of an EBP Journal Club was initiated. Identification of a project of interest to bedside nurses was used to spark interest in EBP. Practice Change: Nurses were invited to attend monthly meetings to discuss concepts involved with EBP. A project, use of lidocaine prior to IV insertion, was identified and a resource nurse with an advanced degree offered guidance. Education on conducting a review of literature on this topic resulted in evidence of current best practice and knowledge of hospital policies. Evaluation: A survey was utilized to both gather baseline data from bedside nurses on their beliefs concerning use of lidocaine during establishment of IV access and their change in beliefs concerning EBP. Results: Involvement and membership in an EBP Journal Club grew as nurses in the facility became aware of the impact that best practice identification could have on patient care and that they could successfully use current literature to guide their practice. Recommendations: This initial activity should be extended to include a pilot study to examine patient satisfaction with lidocaine use prior to IV insertion. Methods to further improve involvement in the EBP journal club by providing a visible symbol of membership along with organizational recognition should be initiated. Presenting these activities at a conference is viewed as essential to the ongoing motivation of this new EBP Journal Club. Lessons Learned: Developing interest among nurses who have time limitations due to work load can be challenging but can be successfully accomplished with managerial support, a core group of interested nurses, and support. Bibliography: Ales, R., May, D., & Whitney, L. (2007). A study comparing cholorprocaine with lidocaine for skin infiltration before intravenous catheter insertion. American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Journal, 75(4), 255-258. Gale, B. V., & Schaffer, M. (2009, Feb). Organizational readiness for evidence-based practice. Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(2), 91-97. Halm, M. (2008, May). Effects of local anesthetics on pain with intravenous catheter insertion. American Journal of Critical Care, 17, 265-268. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Journal; Hospital
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of an Evidence Based Journal Club in a 98 Bed Hospitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203257-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Evidence Based Practice (EBP) at the bedside has had limited implementation even though it is widely accepted that such practice improves nursing care (Gale, 2009). Evidence: Available evidence indicates that nurses may feel overwhelmed and may lack skill in locating and interpreting current research findings. It is also clear that organizational support is crucial to change this culture. Strategy: Development of an EBP Journal Club was initiated. Identification of a project of interest to bedside nurses was used to spark interest in EBP. Practice Change: Nurses were invited to attend monthly meetings to discuss concepts involved with EBP. A project, use of lidocaine prior to IV insertion, was identified and a resource nurse with an advanced degree offered guidance. Education on conducting a review of literature on this topic resulted in evidence of current best practice and knowledge of hospital policies. Evaluation: A survey was utilized to both gather baseline data from bedside nurses on their beliefs concerning use of lidocaine during establishment of IV access and their change in beliefs concerning EBP. Results: Involvement and membership in an EBP Journal Club grew as nurses in the facility became aware of the impact that best practice identification could have on patient care and that they could successfully use current literature to guide their practice. Recommendations: This initial activity should be extended to include a pilot study to examine patient satisfaction with lidocaine use prior to IV insertion. Methods to further improve involvement in the EBP journal club by providing a visible symbol of membership along with organizational recognition should be initiated. Presenting these activities at a conference is viewed as essential to the ongoing motivation of this new EBP Journal Club. Lessons Learned: Developing interest among nurses who have time limitations due to work load can be challenging but can be successfully accomplished with managerial support, a core group of interested nurses, and support. Bibliography: Ales, R., May, D., & Whitney, L. (2007). A study comparing cholorprocaine with lidocaine for skin infiltration before intravenous catheter insertion. American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Journal, 75(4), 255-258. Gale, B. V., & Schaffer, M. (2009, Feb). Organizational readiness for evidence-based practice. Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(2), 91-97. Halm, M. (2008, May). Effects of local anesthetics on pain with intravenous catheter insertion. American Journal of Critical Care, 17, 265-268. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectJournalen_GB
dc.subjectHospitalen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:06:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:06:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.