2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203262
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spotlight on Proper Reporting: Using the PRISMA Guideline
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Often the evidence in systematic reviews is poorly reported, leading to difficulty in evidence appraisal. This may create problems for practice teams who want to implement a practice change and are relying on the quality of the appraised evidence to make a decision. Evidence: The PRISMA Guideline (2009) was developed to assist authors to improve reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Although it was not developed specifically as a quality appraisal tool, we consider proper reporting of items to be a component of a quality report. Strategy: Currently, we are in the process of reviewing evidence to decrease relocation stress in patients being transferred from the intensive care units. A key piece of evidence is a review titled “A Systematic Review of Relocation Stress Following In-House Transfer out of Critical/Intensive Care Units” (Salmond & Evans, 2011). Application of the PRISMA Guideline will be demonstrated on this systematic review. Practice Change: Proper reporting of items in a systematic review is a component of a quality report, and should be considered an important component of the quality appraisal process. Evaluation: The companion full report may be needed to fully explain items on the checklist. Results: Missing or unclear areas in the review will be described, as well as ease of use of the PRISMA Guideline. Recommendations: The PRISMA Guideline is a valuable tool that allows a practice team to determine if items in a systematic review have been properly reported. Lessons Learned: Early identification of missing or unclear items in a systematic review is an important component of a quality appraisal.? Bibliography: Moher,D., Liberati, A., Tetzlaff, J. & Altman, D.G. (2009). The PRISMA Group. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6): e1000097. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097 Salmond, S.W., & Evans, B.M (2011). A Systematic Review of Relocation Stress Following In-House Transfer Out of Critical/Intensive Care Units. Completed review for Joanna Briggs Institute, not yet published. Received from author February, 2011. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Reporting; PRISMA
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpotlight on Proper Reporting: Using the PRISMA Guidelineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203262-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Often the evidence in systematic reviews is poorly reported, leading to difficulty in evidence appraisal. This may create problems for practice teams who want to implement a practice change and are relying on the quality of the appraised evidence to make a decision. Evidence: The PRISMA Guideline (2009) was developed to assist authors to improve reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Although it was not developed specifically as a quality appraisal tool, we consider proper reporting of items to be a component of a quality report. Strategy: Currently, we are in the process of reviewing evidence to decrease relocation stress in patients being transferred from the intensive care units. A key piece of evidence is a review titled “A Systematic Review of Relocation Stress Following In-House Transfer out of Critical/Intensive Care Units” (Salmond & Evans, 2011). Application of the PRISMA Guideline will be demonstrated on this systematic review. Practice Change: Proper reporting of items in a systematic review is a component of a quality report, and should be considered an important component of the quality appraisal process. Evaluation: The companion full report may be needed to fully explain items on the checklist. Results: Missing or unclear areas in the review will be described, as well as ease of use of the PRISMA Guideline. Recommendations: The PRISMA Guideline is a valuable tool that allows a practice team to determine if items in a systematic review have been properly reported. Lessons Learned: Early identification of missing or unclear items in a systematic review is an important component of a quality appraisal.? Bibliography: Moher,D., Liberati, A., Tetzlaff, J. & Altman, D.G. (2009). The PRISMA Group. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6(6): e1000097. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097 Salmond, S.W., & Evans, B.M (2011). A Systematic Review of Relocation Stress Following In-House Transfer Out of Critical/Intensive Care Units. Completed review for Joanna Briggs Institute, not yet published. Received from author February, 2011. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectReportingen_GB
dc.subjectPRISMAen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:06:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:06:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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